Music

 

Abshire, Nathan (& The Pinegrove Boys)

  • His song "French Two-Step" was played during intermission on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour and the 1995 Boxers tour.
  • It was also played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • His song "Hey Mom" was played during intermission on the 2002 tour.
  • Morrissey wanted to include his song "Hey Mom" on his compilation of favourite tracks released in 2003 under the title "Under The Influence", but was denied permission.

Adkins, Hasil

  • The song "The Chicken Walk" was played during intermission early on the 2007 Greatest Hits tour and on portions of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.

A-ha

  • In an interview published in the July 1987 issue of Creem magazine, Morrissey was asked to name acts who sold more records than the Smiths but didn't sell-out concerts. He replied "Well, I can, but I don't want to sound bitter or twisted. An example might be A-ha, whom I happen to like a great deal. On the last tour, we were doing two shows, as they were cancelling their one show because they couldn't fill the auditorium. And yet a look at the charts showed them with a single at number two and an album at number nine."
  • When he played Norway on 5 July 2004, Morrissey started the show by teasing the crowd with a line of the A-ha song "The Sun Always Shines On TV".

Alan Price Set

  • The song "Simon Smith and His Amazing Dancing Bear" (written by Randy Newman) features the chorus: "I may go out tomorrow / If I can borrow a coat to wear / Oh, I'd step out in style / With my sincere smile / And my dancing bear / Outrageous, alarming / Courageous, charming". This has many similarities with lines found in the Smiths' "This Charming Man".
  • A video of the latter song was shown before concerts on the 2009 Swords Tour.

All The Young

  • They opened for Morrissey on 1 date of his 2011 tour.

Alpert, Herb and the Tijuana Brass

  • The inner sleeve of the "I'm Throwing My Arms Around Paris" cd-single #1 showed on one side a photo of Morrissey's musicians holding the following LPs by Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass: "What Now My Love", "South Of The Border", "The Lonely Bull" and "Going Places".
  • The font used on the "South Of The Border" album inspired the one used on Morrissey's album "Years Of Refusal", while the font on Alpert's "What Now My Love" album seems to have inspired the one used on Morrissey's single "Irish Blood, English Heart".
  • Hw was asked to play on the "Years Of Refusal" album but declined.

al-Sahir, Kazem

  • Morrissey's people got into negotiations with the Iranian government late 2007 / early 2008 to play a concert in Iran. They were aiming for a date in Tehran in June 2008, ideally with the internationally-acclaimed Arab pop singer Kazem al-Sahir, were he amenable.

Amen Corner

  • In an interview given to Len Brown in 1997 for the "Brit Girls" series, Morrissey mentions loving this band in the 1960s.

Andrews, Chris

  • A video of the song "Yesterday Man" was shown before Morrissey concerts on his 2014 tour.

Angelic Upstarts

  • Their "Best Of" album was played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • In the 1994 video for the single "The More You Ignore Me, The Closer I Get", the little girl (Boz Boorer's daughter Billie-Rose) has the name of the band written on her crown and the t-shirt she is wearing shows the cover of the Angelic Upstarts' "Greatest Hits Live" album.
  • Every night on the Boxers tour Morrissey would use a tambourine with something written on it, and then throw it into the audience. In Cardiff on that tour the word was MENSI, the name of this band's lead singer.
  • Their song "Never Had Nothing" was played during intermission on the 1995 Boxers tour and the 1995 dates promoting the "Southpaw Grammar" album.
  • Their songs "Teenage Warning", "Kids On The Streets" and "I'm An Upstart" could also be heard in the intermission music played before gigs on the 1995 dates promoting "Southpaw Grammar".
  • In the introduction to the "Introducing Morrissey" live video release of a concert from the February 1995 Boxers tour, Morrissey is seen putting up posters of the Angelic Upstarts.
  • The band was mentioned as a big influence on Morrissey on a press release for the "Maladjusted" album from 1997.

Angelou, Maya

  • Her spoken word piece "No No No No" was played during intermission on the 1999-2000 Oye Esteban tour.
  • She was invited to perform at the 2004 Meltdown Festival which Morrissey curated, but declined.

Anyones, The

Apex Theory

  • Their song "Bravo" was played during intermission on the 2002 tour.
  • Their song "Apossibly" was played during intermission on the third American leg of the Greatest Hits tour.

Armatrading, Joan

  • The line "she'll take the worry from your head, but then again, she'll put trouble in your heart instead" in her song "Down To Zero" might have inspired the line "She took away your troubles, oh but then again, she left pain" in the Smiths' "This Night Has Opened My Eyes".
  • The line "Why do you come here, (...) when you know I've got troubles enough?" in her song "The Weakness In Me" might have inspired the similar one in Morrissey's "Suedehead".
  • The lines "Things have looked bad / but now some years later" and "Since I took up with you" from her song "Turn Out The Light" very likely inspired Morrissey when he was writing "Billy Budd".
  • In a press release announcing that he would be playing the Wireless Festival in Hyde Park in July 2008, Morrissey mentioned Armatrading as one of the previous "Hyde Park greats".

Ayshea

  • Her song "Farewell" could supposedly be heard in the intermission music played before gigs on the 1992 Your Arsenal tour.

Aznavour, Charles

  • A video of him singing "Emmenez-moi" was shown before concerts on the 2014 tour.

B-52's

  • In a private letter to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet), Morrissey mentioned that he particularly liked their song "6060-842".

Balfa Brothers

  • Their song "Casey Jones" was played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • It was also played during intermission on the 1995 Boxers tour.

Bardot, Brigitte

  • Her song "Nue Au Soleil" was played during intermission on the 1999 Oye Esteban tour.
  • Her song "Bubble Gum" was played during intermission on the 2002 tour and the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour.
  • Her songs "Harley Davidson", "Contact" and "Ce n'est pas vrai" could also be heard in the intermission music on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour.
  • She was invited to perform at the 2004 Meltdown Festival which Morrissey curated, but declined.
  • A video of her performing "Bubble Gum" was shown between opening act and Morrissey on dates from the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI and the Greatest Hits tour from 2007.
  • See also Serge Gainsbourg.

Barry, John

  • The James Bond opening "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour. One third into the year 2000 portion of the Oye Esteban tour that song became the one Morrissey walked on stage to.
  • "Thunderball", the John Barry Orchestra collaboration with Tom Jones, was played before concerts during portions of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.

Bassey, Shirley

  • On the Queen Is Dead tour in 1986 her song "You'll Never Walk Alone" was heard after the Smiths' gigs, as the fans exited the venue. Morrissey repeated this for his first solo concert, a one-off thing in Wolverhampton in December 1988.
  • In an interview for Star Hits in 1987 Morrissey was asked what was in his Walkman and he answered Shirley Bassey. He then went on to express his disappointment at her having recently collaborated with the band Yello.
  • when interviewed by Sounds magazine in June 1988, Morrissey said "I went to see her last night, I thought she was excellent. I'd love to meet her, I'd love to touch the end of her dress."
  • Her song "Don't Take The Lovers From The World" was mentioned in a list of Morrissey favourites titled "Singles To Be Cremated With" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.
  • She was mentioned in a list of Morrissey's favourite singers titled "Bigmouths - The Singer Not The Song" published in the same issue of the NME.
  • On the Kill Uncle tour in 1991 and the Your Arsenal tour in 1992 her version of "Ave Maria" was heard after Morrissey's gigs, as the fans exited the venue.
  • For a few dates on the 2002 tour her song "This Is My Life" was heard after Morrissey's gigs, as the fans exited the venue.
  • In concert at the London Palladium on 28 May 2006 Morrissey mentioned some of the heroes who had motivated his choice of venue: "It's very very nailbiting to think that Sacha stood here and to think that Gracie Fields stood over there... as you'll remember... and Burly Chassis came on this way..." ("Burly Chassis" was some British comedy's word-play on Shirley Bassey who used to belt out songs in the 60's at the Palladium). While he said this Morrissey actually mimicked 'Burly Chassis' by making pounding footstep noises.
  • Her song "I Who Have Nothing" was played before concerts at the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI. Morrissey also enjoys Petula Clark's version of the same song.
  • A video of her performing "To Give Is The Reason I Live" on RAI TV was shown during intermission on portions of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.
  • "Let Me Sing And I'm Happy" was mentioned as an early favourite in Morrissey's autobiography.

Beatles

  • Morrissey, in a 1984 interview (source needed): "I won't deny that I like some of the Beatles songs... it's dramatically unfashionable to say that but I do. A lot of them I can't stand... so where does that leave us?"
  • In an interview given to journalist Len Brown, printed in his biography titled "Meetings With Morrissey": "Some bits of Sgt. Pepper... I really like 'A Day In The Life', 'Lovely Rita'. Obviously I'm a great Beatles fan."

Beck

  • Morrissey wore a Beck t-shirt in the video for his song "Alma Matters".
  • He was one of the artists Morrissey picked as guests when he headlined the 2008 O2 Wireless Festival in London.
  • In an interview published in June 2008 in Irish magazine Hot Press Morrissey answered the question "Are you a particularly big fan of [Beck]?" with "No, I don't really know much about him. I knew a woman at the time of that video who dared me to wear the t-shirt, so I did, and she was thrilled."

Beck, Jeff

  • This legendary guitarist was asked by Morrissey to play on the 2009 song "Black Cloud".

Berlin, Irving

  • The title line in "The Song Is Ended" from Ziegfeld Follies is followed by "...but the melody lingers on", a possible inspiration for the title of Morrissey's compilation of promotional films titled "The Malady Lingers On". However it must be said that comedian Les Dawson came up with the pun before Morrissey and might be the source of the compilation's title.

(Betjeman, Sir John)

  • On the 2002 tour Morrissey walked on stage following a 1973 recording of him reciting his poem "A Child Ill". This was also included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks titled "Songs To Save Your Life" given away with the 19 June 2004 issue of the NME.
  • See the literature section for more John Betjeman.

Big Country

  • In an interview to GQ magazine in 2005, when asked what he thought of Big Country's song "Wonderland", Morrissey answered "lovely, seriously".

Big Hard Excellent Fish

  • Their 'song' "Imperfect List" was played right before Morrissey took the stage on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour. The version used by Morrissey was approximately 5 minutes long and didn't include "Mike Gatting" in it.
  • Morrissey used the 'song' as walk-on music again on some dates of the 2007-2008 Greatest Hits tour.

Big Sandy And The Flyrite Trio

Birkin, Jane

  • She was invited by Morrissey to perform at the Meltdown festival which he curated in 2004.
  • In interview to Time Out magazine at the time, Morrissey said: "Jane Birkin is a leaf on a tree in a storm."

Black, Cilla

  • In a private letter to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet), Morrissey mentioned that he was listening to Cilla Black amongst others at that time.
  • Her song "The Right One Is Left" was mentioned with nine other records in a list titled "Portrait Of The Artist As A Consumer", Morrissey's top ten films, symbolists, records and books published in the 17 September 1983 issue of the NME.
  • On the British leg of the 1984 tour promoting the smiths' debut album, the band entered stage following her song "Love Of The Loved".
  • Morrissey interviewed by The Face magazine in 1984: "But the one thing that saved me in spite of my uncommon perversions, liking Cilla Black and Oscar Wilde - being a working class person from Manchester it really doesn't help being obsessed by Oscar Wilde - was my ability at athletics."
  • In "Yeahs And Yeuks", a list of loved and hated songs published in No.1 magazine in 1985, her song "The Right One Is Left" was listed at #4 in the "yeahs" section.
  • Her song "Work Is A Four-Letter Word" was covered by The Smiths in 1987.
  • "Love Of The Loved" was included on the pre-concert tape at Morrissey's one-off show in Wolverhampton in December 1988.
  • Her version of "Work Is A Four-Letter Word" was played during intermission on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.
  • Morrissey, Vox magazine 1993: "I worship every belch of Cilla Black."
  • In an interview for the Brit Girls documentary first broadcast in November 1997 (UK, Channel 4), Morrissey said "She made some great records and great b-sides but I think she's very dodgy now. (On covering 'Work Is A Four Letter Word) I thought it was an amusing song. I think I was the only member of the Smiths who actually did. I thought it was quite funny and very throwaway, and a bit of a tease really. I wasn't attempting to produce a great piece of Gothic Art, it was just a taunting little number. I even got the words wrong, accidentally. (...) It was very instrumental in breaking up the Smiths but what care I? Cilla Black, unbeknownst to herself, actually broke the Smiths up... which is pretty much to her credit.
  • Morrissey, in a Q&A session on the True-To-You website in June 2007: "Everything has its place and its reason. Certainly, the early Smiths covers, for example 'Work is a four-letter word' and 'Golden lights' were done as acts of playful perversity - they weren't meant to be groundbreaking miracles of sound. And that's usually how it is, just a matter of throwing something unexpected into the mix."

Black Beetle

Black Box

  • Morrissey, in an interview to Q magazine in December 1989: "I'm still a big record fan. I really enjoyed the Black Box single. It's odd for me because it's not my world at all and there's no reason on earth why I should enjoy that record, but when I first saw them on Top Of The Pops I thought it was pretty extreme. She also looked brilliant, and I still love the record after nine weeks (...) I'm more interested in the rumours that she has been male. I'm hoping that it's true because it makes it more interesting. If you look at her from a certain angle, you could possibly see her playing for Wigan."

Black Kids

  • They were picked by Morrissey as guests when he headlined the 2008 O2 Wireless Festival in London.

Blaggers I.T.A.

  • Morrissey, in an interview to Raygun magazine in March 1994, when asked about new music he enjoys: "From here? I can't think of anything. Within England, certainly groups like the Blaggers and Gallon Drunk and Echobelly sound new to me it sounds as if I'm actually hearing something new. Which seems to be an impossible occurrence in America."

Bob And Marcia

  • According to Johnny Marr, "Girlfriend In A Coma" was based on their song "Young, Gifted And Black" which both he and Morrissey loved.
  • The latter song was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • On the occasion of re-release of "EVeryday Is Like Sunday", Morrissey's Facebook page created a Spotify playlist of Morrissey 'Supreme 13 Singles' which included "Young, Gifted And Black".

Bolan, Marc
   See T-Rex.

Bowie, David

  • In private letters to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet), Morrissey mentioned that he had seen Bowie in concert 14 times, and that he particularly liked the song "Fantastic Voyage".
  • The line "Throw your homework onto the fire" from the Smiths' 1987 single "Sheila Take A Bow" is very reminiscent of one of the lines from Bowie's "Kooks": "and if the homework brings you down then we'll throw it on the fire".
  • His song "The Laughing Gnome" was played during intermission on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.
  • Bowie duetted with Morrissey on "Cosmic Dancer" on 2 June 1991 in Los Angeles.
  • The line "We will descend on anyone unable to defend themselves" in "We'll Let You Know" may be a twist on "Love descends on those defenceless" from Bowie's "Soul Love".
  • In an interview given to Jools Holland in 1995 Morrissey said of Bowie: "He changed British pop and I think that's an incredible thing. (...) He changed British pop in a very dangerous way because of the way he looked and the things he said."
  • In an interview printed in the May 1994 issue of Select magazine Morrissey said: "Put it this way, Mozzer, you have a card from Dirk Bogarde here. You have Alan Bennett sitting in your kitchen having tea. You have David Bowie having sung one of your songs quite beautifully. What else are you looking for? What right do I have to be sour-faced and complaining, queuing up at Waitrose in Holloway being annoyed because somebody in front of me has got a leg of lamb? What more could there be?"
  • The line "You're watching yourself but you're too unfair" in his "Rock 'n' Roll Suicide" might have inspired the similar one in "Do Your Best And Don't Worry".
  • Morrissey accepted to support Bowie on his 1995 Outside Tour. He stayed on board for two weeks then pulled out.
  • In an interview published in the Times Magazine in 1999, Morrissey addressed the latter events when he said "I have never spoken about this up until now because, in spite of everything, I do respect David. I simply have to play Star Man or Drive-in Saturday and I will forgive him for anything. But I left that tour because he put me under a lot of pressure, and I found it too exhausting. But then, Bowie is principally a business, and I can't imagine he would have telephoned his own mother without considering the career implications. David surrounded himself with very strong people, and that's the secret of his power: that everything he does will be seen in a certain light. But it certainly wasn't the greatest career move that I ever made, even though they gave 6,000 refunds in Manchester when I didn't appear - but I don't think you'd have read about that in the Manchester Evening News..."
  • Morrissey, in a 2003 interview (source needed): "He was a fascinating artist in 1970, 1971, 1972... but not now."
  • Morrissey asked David Bowie (through their common producer Tony Visconti) to cover the Righteous Brothers' "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling", but Bowie declined.
  • Morrissey, in an interview to XL magazine in 2006: "He is a mystery to me. He has the mentality of a vampire, he is always searching for fresh blood to suck. I don't know if he did the same thing with me. I don't think he is now the same person he was 30 years ago. That David Bowie doesn't exist anymore."
  • In an interview published in June 2008 in Irish magazine Hot Press Morrissey said "He was so important to me because his vocal melodies were so strong and his appearance was so confrontational. Manchester, then, was full of boot boys and skinheads and macho-macho thugs, but I saw Bowie's appearance as the ultimate bravery. To me, it took guts to be David Bowie, not to be a shit-kicking skinhead in a pack. At the time Wayne County had a song called 'Are You Man Enough To Be A Woman?' and I thought it applied to the Manchester thugs of 1972, which is why I actually saw Bowie's bravery as very strong, and not floppy or dippy. He just did not care. And all people care to a ridiculous degree - we're all so frightened and boxed-in. (...) It also seemed to me that his impact was bigger than punk, because he was a one-man revolution, yet it is punk that's remembered as the big turnaround of the '70s. The Outside tour didn't work, though, because after a time knowing David I realised that he actually thought I was the singer from Suede - a fate worse than life. Can you imagine the indignity? I hope not..."
  • In an interview to Radionica (Columbia) in early 2012, Morrissey mentioned David Bowie in a list of artists he was indebted to, and that he would like to sing "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling" with him. He also said "David Bowie took me one night to his studio in New York and played a version of one of my songs. I cried for a week. Of anything for what I have prayed in my life, I never imagined that I would be given so much."
  • The sleeve of the 2013 redesigned "The Last Of The Famous International Playboys" single was originally going to feature a previously unseen private photograph of David Bowie and Morrissey taken by Linder Sterling in New York in 1992. Although Bowie has no legal rights to the photograph, most of his back catalogue was at the time licensed to EMI so he successfully managed to order EMI UK not to run the proposed artwork.
  • In his autobiography, Morrissey talks about buying Bowie's "Starman" single, seeing him live, and the effect the artist had on him when he was a teenager. He also discusses other meetings with his idol, singing a duet with him and having him cover one of his songs, etc.

Bow Wow Wow

  • Their cover of the Smiths' "I Started Something I Couldn't Finish" was played during intermission on a portion of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.

Boyfriends, The

Bradford

  • They supported Morrissey on his very first solo concert in December 1988 in Wolverhampton.
  • Their song "Skin Storm" from the "Shouting Quietly" album was covered by Morrissey and released as a b-side to the "Pregnant For The Last Time" single (or the "My Love Life" single in the USA).

Bragg, Billy

Bresslaw, Bernard

  • It has been speculated that his 1958 song "Mad Passionate Love" from this "Carry On..." regular inspired the title for Morrissey's song "Pashernate Love".

Britten, Benjamin

  • "Moonlight", an excerpt of the "Sea Interludes" from his "Peter Grimes" opera, is heard in the video for the song "Boxers".

Brother

  • They opened for Morrissey on 2 dates of his 2011 tour.

Buckley, Jeff

  • On the occasion of Friday the 13th August 2010, Morrissey sent to thequietus.com a list of his top 13 albums, which included Buckley's "Grace" at #12.

Buckley, Tim

  • He came in at #15 in a top 15 list of "most revered singers" put up on the True To You website on 1 January 2014, despite never having been mentioned as a favourite before.

Burnette, Johnny

  • His song "Rock-A-Billy Boogie" was featured in the intermission music on the third American leg of the Greatest Hits tour and on portions of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.

Burns, Pete
   See Dead Or Alive.

Business

  • Their song "Scagheads" was played during intermission on the 1999-2000 Oye Esteban tour.

Buzzcocks

  • In a letter to the editor published by the NME in the mid/late 1970s Morrissey wrote: "I have made the impertinence to inform the masses of a quartet infamously known as Buzzcocks who seem to fit so neatly into the punk category, yet have been eschewed from all chances of recognition. Buzzcocks differ only one way from their contemporaries: they possess a spark of originality (that was important once, remember?), and their music gives you the impression they spend longer than the customary ten minutes clutching the quill in preparation to write. Indubitably, Buzzcocks will hardly figure strongly - or even weakly - in the NME poll, and in these dark days when Patti Smith, Loudon Wainwright or even the New York Dolls fail to make an impact on Radio 1 DJs, common sense is therefore not so common. Both this letter and Buzzcocks themselves will probably be filed and forgotten. But for now, they are the best kick-ass rock band in the country."

  • In an interview publised by Face magazine in July 1984 Morrissey answered the question "Were the Buzzcocks and Pete Shelley in particular, near and dear to you?" with the answer "Mmmmm. Yes. They had an endearingly confused quality... really Northern, dim and appealingly camp."
  • Singer Pete Shelley opened for the Smiths on what would turn out to be their final concert on 12 December 1986.
  • The band was slotted by Morrissey at #3 in a list of favourite Manchester musical artists published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME under the title "Moanchester, So Much To Answer For".
  • Morrissey covered their song "You Say You Don't Love Me" on some live dates in 2008, and once in 2009.
  • When invited to play his favourite bands on KCRW's Guest DJ Project in August 2008, Morrissey chose their song "You Say You Don't Love Me".

Bygraves, Max

  • His song "Fings Ain't What They Used To Be" was played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • It can be speculated that the line "I'm tired and I want to go to bed" from Asleep were lifted from the traditional folk song "Show Me The Way To Go Home". Morrissey did indeed sing a few lines from the song in Hull on the Tour Of Refusal. If so, the version Morrissey was most likely exposed to is by Max Bygraves.

Cafe Tacuba

  • Morrissey presented this band with a 'Legends' award at the 2009 MTV Latin Music Awards.

Callas, Maria

  • Her recordings of "Ebben? Ne Andro Lontana" and "Samson and Delilah" were played before the concerts on the 2009 Swords Tour.

Cats, The

  • Their instrumental ska version of "Swan Lake" was played during intermission on the 1999-2000 Oye Esteban tour.
  • It was also included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks released in 2003 under the title "Under The Influence".

Chicory Tip

  • In an interview given to journalist Len Brown and published in the NME in 1988 Morrissey said "Johnny and I once drove 250 miles to get a copy of 'Good Grief Christina'!" In unpublished parts of the interview that have since appeared in Len Brown's biography titled "Meetings With Morrissey", we learn that Morrissey also said "...and 'What's Your Name', which was the third hit, was excellent."
  • In an interview published in the January 2006 issue of Uncut, Johnny Marr also tells the above story about driving 250 miles to get one of their singles.

Chopin

  • In a Q&A published on the True-To-You website in February 2006, Morrissey answered the question "Which classical music period would you say you prefer, and who are your favorite composers from that period?" with "I'm no expert when it comes to classical music. My favorite is Chopin's Nocturnes... Yes, I know, quite a common choice - a bit like naming the Beatles as your favorites. Anyway, there is a reasonably new CD by Angela Hewitt of this, which is well worth buying."
  • Chopin's Nocturnes were sometimes played before the usual intermission music on certain European dates from the Spring of 2006.

Cinquetti, Gigliola

  • A video of him performing "Si" at 1974's Eurovision Song Contest was shown between opening act and Morrissey on dates from the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • In an interview publised in XL magazine in 2006 Morrissey said "When I was six I bought 'Heart' (Cuore) by Rita Pavone. I still own it. And then...Gigliola Cinquetti, do you know the song 'Yes'? It represented Italy at the eurofestival."

Clark, Petula

  • Her song "Downtown" was played during intermission on the 1995 Boxers tour and the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • Her song "I Who Have Nothing" was played during intermission on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour and the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI. Morrissey also enjoys Shirley Bassey's version of the same song.

Clash, The

  • In a 2000 interview Joe Strummer mentioned having been approached to produce a Morrissey album sometime around 1995. In the liner notes found in the 2009 expanded and redesigned edition of the "Maladjusted" album, Morrissey mentioned having considered him to produced the album.
  • In a July 1997 radio interview to KROQ, one of the songs Morrissey selected to be played was "London Calling" by The Clash. When asked about his choice, Morrissey answered "It's a great song. I think it's nice and British and very urban and quite violent and so forth, very west London."

Cochran, Eddie

  • His song "Nervous Breakdown" was played during intermission on an American leg of the 1991 Kill Uncle tour (and perhaps more).
  • He has a song called "Sweetie Pie", just like Morrissey, but that could simply be coincidence.

Cockney Rejects

  • Their songs "Greatest Cockney Ripoff", "East End" and "I Wanna Be A Star" were played during intermission on the 1999-2000 Oye Esteban tour. Morrissey's appreciation of the West Ham Boys Club (he wore their t-shirts and made lyric changes namedropping West Ham) at the time paralleled that of the Cockney Rejects' love of West Ham FC.
  • They were invited to perform at the 2004 Meltdown festival which Morrissey curated. In an interview to Time Out magazine at the time Morrissey said: "The Cockney Rejects were Liam and Noel before Liam and Noel were Liam and Noel. I never quite understood what their politics were meant to be. I've always seen them as just a great pop band with great singles. I hope they play the old tunes of glory."
  • Their songs "The Greatest Cockney Rip-off" and "East End" were played during intermission on the third American leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • When invited to play his favourite bands on KCRW's Guest DJ Project in August 2008, Morrissey chose their song "Greatest Cockney Ripoff".
  • Morrissey wrote the foreword to Jeff Turner's autobiography titled "Cockney Reject".

Cogan, Alma

  • It has been speculated that the "The more you give your trust, the more youre bound to lose" line in "If Love Were All" (written by Noel Coward, see further in this list) inspired some words in Morrissey's "Found Found Found".
  • Her version of "If Love Were All" was played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • Twice on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI Morrissey started the show by singing a few lines from "If Love Were All": "I believe, that since my life began, the most I've had is just a talent to amuse..." before going into his own song.

Cohen, Leonard

  • The line "Everything depends upon how near you sleep to me" in his song "Take This Longing" might have inspired a similar one in the Smiths' "Hand In Glove". Buffy Sainte-Marie covered this song (under the alternate title "Bells") and it's probably her version that Morrissey is fond of. See Buffy Sainte-Marie.

Cole, Lloyd

  • Morrissey, in an interview published in Melody Maker on 3 November 1984: "Lloyd is a tremendously nice person, much more fascinating than anything he's ever put on vinyl, which I'm sure will end the relationship straight away, but I think he's a lovely person. We see quite a lot of each other."
  • According to Sandie Shaw, the song "Are You Ready To Be Heartbroken" (which she covered) was Morrissey's favourite of Cole's.

Collins, Dave and Ansel

  • Their song "Double Barrel" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.

Cooke, Sam

  • His song "There, I've Said It Again" was mentioned in a list of Morrissey favourites titled "Singles To Be Cremated With" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.

Cookies

  • Their song "I Want A Boyfriend For My Birthday" was rehearsed very early in the Smiths' career, and it was played live twice, at the band's first two shows. They soon lost interest in the song as their own catalogue expanded, so they never recorded it with the aim of releasing it.
  • That song was mentioned with nine other records in a list titled "Portrait Of The Artist As A Consumer", Morrissey's top ten films, symbolists, records and books published in the 17 September 1983 issue of the NME.
  • In "Yeahs And Yeuks", a list of loved and hated songs published in No.1 magazine in 1985, their song "I Want A Boy For My Birthday" was listed at #8 in the "yeahs" section.
  • The music to Morrissey's "Girl Least Likely To" - written by Andy Rourke - was obviously inspired by the Cookies song "Only To Other People". Both songs even share the phrase "How many times..." sung to the same melody.

Cope, Julian

  • His album "Fried" was mentioned by Morrissey as one of his favourites of 1984, although he said that he liked it for its title. (source needed)

Costello, Elvis

  • Something from his "Armed Forces" album was supposedly included in the intermission music played before gigs on the 1995 dates promoting "Southpaw Grammar".

Courteeners, The

  • They were picked by Morrissey as guests when he headlined the 2008 O2 Wireless Festival in London.
  • When invited to play his favourite bands on KCRW's Guest DJ Project in August 2008, Morrissey chose their song "What Took You So Long".
  • They supported Morrissey for the second half of the American leg of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.

Couty, Nat & The Braves

  • Their song "Woodpecker Rock" was played during intermission on the 1995 Boxers tour.
  • It was also included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks released in 2003 under the title "Under The Influence". In that album's liner notes Morrissey wrote: "(...) the imagination chatters convulsively through Nat Couty's 'Woodpecker Rock', Charlie Feathers' 'one Hand Loose', Jimmy Radcliffe's 'The Forgotten Man', and Jay Bee Wasden's 'De Castro'. Of these last four, I would not pretend to know any background details, but the happiness these songs give me seems, now, to be everlasting - even if this is music played with a lop-sided grim, then please hook me."

Coward, Noel

  • In a private letter to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet), Morrissey mentioned that he was listening to Noel Coward amongst others at that time.
  • It has been speculated that the lines "I do believe that the more you give your love, and I do believe that the more you offer trust, the more you're bound to lose" and "somebody splendid, someone affectionate and dear" in Coward's "If Love Were All" inspired some words in Morrissey's "Found Found Found".
  • The sample heard at the end of Morrissey's "Lifeguard Sleeping, Girl Drowning" was lifted from the movie "In Which We Serve" which was directed by Coward. He also starred in it.
  • Twice on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI Morrissey started the show by singing a few lines from "If Love Were All": "I believe, that since my life began, the most I've had is just a talent to amuse..." before going into his own song.
  • When invited to play his favourite bands on KCRW's Guest DJ Project in August 2008, Morrissey chose his song "There Are Bad Times Just Around The Corner".
  • See Alma Cogan higher in this list. She recorded her own version of "If Love Were All".
  • Also see the literature section for more Noel Coward.

Cramps

  • In a letter published in a June 1979 issue of Sounds magazine, Morrissey wrote: "The Cramps are worth their weight in gold for making the Police seem like a great big sloppy bowl of mush. (...) The Cramps were enough to restore faith in the most spiritless. They have it all, and their drummer is the most compelling in rock history. Back to the Cramps or perish. It is written."
  • In another letter published in July 1979, this time in the NME, Morrissey wrote "I've just seen the Cramps and they're at that funny stage. This is the kind of group that start revolutionary outrages and all that."
  • In a letter published in Record Mirror magazine in April 1980 Morrissey wrote "Who are the Cramps? (...) This is a group not to be analysed, but to be FELT. (...) They are the most beautiful - yes BEAUTIFUL group I've ever seen. The fact that they exist is enough.(...) They are the most important US export since the New York Dolls, but God forbid they don't suffer the Dolls' fate."
  • Shortly after Morrissey co-founded a Cramps fanclub called "The Legion Of The Cramped".

Crass

  • Their song "Do They Owe Us A Living?" was played during intermission early on the 2007 Greatest Hits tour.

Crosby, Bing

  • His version of "Whenever It Snows" is heard on Morrissey's "Hulmerist" compilation of videos. "Christmas In Killarny" is also heard on it, but it hasn't been determined if the version is Bing Crosby's.

Crystals

  • Their song "What A Nice Way To Turn 17" was mentioned in a list of Morrissey favourites titled "Singles To Be Cremated With" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.
  • Songs from their "Best Of" were played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • Their song "Hold Me Squeeze Me" was played during intermission on the 1995 Boxers tour.
  • On the occasion of re-release of "EVeryday Is Like Sunday", Morrissey's Facebook page created a Spotify playlist of Morrissey 'Supreme 13 Singles' which included the Crystals' "All Grown Up".

Cultivators, The

  • They supported Morrissey in Minneapolis on 8 February 2000.

Curtis, Mac

  • "Blue Jean Heart" was played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".

Curved Air

  • Their song "Backstreet Luv" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • The band was mentioned in an interview given by Morrissey during the Maladjusted tour and published in the January 1998 issue of Swedish magazine Pop.

Damned, the

  • Their song "New Rose" was played during intermission on the summer festivals leg of the Greatest Hits tour.

Darren, James

  • He requested that his song "Goodbye Cruel World" be played when he was interviewed by Janice Long in October 2008.

Davis, Skeeter

  • A sample of "The End Of The World" is heard in the intro of the UK version of "I've Changed My Plea To Guilty". The version of the song released in the USA does not feature the sample.

Dawson, Ronnie

  • His song "Rockin' In The Cemetary" was played during intermission on an American leg of the 1991 Kill Uncle tour (and perhaps more).

Dead 60s

Dead Or Alive

  • In a November 1984 interview to Melody Maker, Morrissey said "I saw a video recently that was the very first video I ever liked. It was, I admit with massive shame, the Dead Or Alive video for 'That's The Way I Like It'. I thought Pete Burns was quite stunning. I thought, 'Oh I must meet him.' He's the only person I want to meet."
  • Morrissey's wish came true, for a period of a few months in 1985 ha and Dead Or Alive lead singer Pete Burns became friends.
  • In a March 1985 interview to Melody Maker, Morrissey said of Pete Burns: "I think he's a wonderful person. He's one of the few people I can feel a great affinity with. Namely, because he says exactly what he wants to. Which, of course, is a national sin within music, especially considering the things he wants to say."
  • Burns appeared on stage with the Smiths on 6 April 1985 in London to duet with Morrissey on "Barbarism Begins At Home".
  • On the short Scottish tour of September 1985 the Smiths' intermission music played before gigs included their song "You Spin Me Round".
  • A joint interview of Burns and Morrissey was published by Smash Hits in October 1985.
  • In a Q&A published in Uncut magazine in 2006, Morrissey answered the question "Julian Cope or Pete Burns?" with "Pete Burns".

Dears, The

  • They opened for Morrissey in Toronto and Devore on the You Are The Quarry tour in 2004.

Delrons, The

  • It is speculated that the song "Bye Bye Baby" might have inspired some lyrics of "Girlfriend In A Coma".
  • See related band Reparata.

Dempsey, Damien

  • He opened for Morrissey in Manchester, Dublin and on a bunch of American dates on the You Are The Quarry tour in 2004.
  • He was invited to perform at the 2004 Meltdown festival which Morrissey curated.
  • His song "Factories" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks titled "Songs To Save Your Life" given away with the 19 June 2004 issue of the NME.
  • In a Q&A published in Mojo in 2004, when asked "What music are you currently grooving to?", Morrissey answered "Damien Dempsey, 'Seize The Day'. He has the most stunning voice in the universe."
  • Morrissey, in interview to Time Out in 2004: "Damien Dempsey has a better voice and better songs than the artists he looks up to."
  • In a Q&A given to the True-To-You website in January 2006 Morrissey said "I'm the world's biggest Damien Dempsey fan, but every night he kept saying exactly the same things onstage, so one night I met him walking offstage and jumped on his back. He enjoyed that... and... so did I ..."
  • Something of his was played during intermission on the summer festivals leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • He requested that his song "Jar Song" be played when he was interviewed by Janice Long in October 2008.
  • "Jar Song" was played during intermission on a portion of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.
  • On the occasion of Friday the 13th August 2010, Morrissey sent to thequietus.com a list of his top 13 albums, which included Damien Dempsey's "Seize The Day" at #10.
  • He came in at #11 in a top 15 list of "most revered singers" put up on the True To You website on 1 January 2014.

Devoto, Howard
   See Magazine.

Dios

  • They supported Morrissey in Los Angeles on 26 April 2004.

Dirty Pretty Things

  • They were picked by Morrissey as guests when he headlined the 2008 O2 Wireless Festival in London.

Distel, Sacha

  • Morrissey considered having Distel play the Meldown festival which he curated, but Distel was too ill and actually passed away a few weeks later.
  • Morrissey often expressed his appreciation of Sacha Distel's work in interviews given in early 2006.
  • For the first few months of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI a photo of Sacha Distel was used as a stage backdrop.
  • Morrissey was often seen holding Distel items (records,etc.) in promotional/interview photos taken in 2006.
  • In concert at the London Palladium on 28 May 2006 Morrissey mentioned some of the heroes who had motivated his choice of venue: "It's very very nailbiting to think that Sacha stood here and to think that Gracie Fields stood over there... as you'll remember..."
  • A video of him performing "Où ça où ça" was shown between opening act and Morrissey on dates from the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI into the 2007-2008 Greatest Hits tour dates.
  • He is mentioned as an early favourite in Morrissey's autobiography.

Dodd, Ken

  • His song "Happiness" was played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI. Morrissey also had that song's title printed on the bass drum's skin for some time in the middle of that tour.
  • Morrissey mentioned Ken Dodd to his audience - as one of the famous people who had once played this venue - when he played the London Palladium on 14 may 2006.
  • In a Q&A published in Uncut magazine in 2006, Morrissey answered the question "Bernard Manning or Jim Bowen?" with "Odd Ken Dodd".

Dolan, Joe

  • A video of his song "You're Such A Good Looking Woman" was shown before concerts on the 2009 Swords Tour.

Doll And The Kicks

  • He requested that their song "Roll Up The Red Carpet" be played when he was interviewed by Janice Long in October 2008.
  • They supported Morrissey in England and the rest of Europe on the 2009 Tour of Refusal as well as on the Swords tour later the same year.
  • Their cover of Morrissey's "I'm Throwing My Arms Around Paris" was played during intermission for a segment of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.
  • In an interview reported on the NME website in October 2010, Morrissey said "When I first saw Doll & The Kicks live, I could not, even with the best will in the world, look away. I can't be reasoned with where Hannah is concerned – she is the best British singer of recent years. She will sing an entire song without any breathing lulls, and the boys seal her confidence brilliantly. How they work off each other is the most any group could give; the soft tones as arresting as the muscular tones. They certainly deserve far more serious treatment than they have received. (...) The fact that they remain unsigned is bizarre beyond belief, but insofar as I can tell, the entire point of the X Factor culture is to starve genuine music out of existence."

Donegan, Lonnie

  • Morrissey supposedly mentioned loving his song "My Old Man's A Dustman" as a kid. (source needed)

Dors, Diana

  • In the video for his single "Interesting Drug", Morrissey is seen holding a mock-up issue of the NME with Diana Dors on the cover.
  • She was included by Morrissey in a list titled "Handsome Devils" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.
  • Her song "So Little Time" was played during intermission on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.
  • Interviewed in 1997 for the Brit Girls documentary, Morrissey said "Diana Dors made the best record of the Sixties. 'So Little Time' in 1964 on the Fontana label, which sank with a trace. I don't know why but maybe people couldn't accept her as a singer because she was known for other things. She was incredibly sexual. Not so much a girl singer, more womanly. She made an album that's very rare called The Swinging Dors, which is not really very good. She didn't have a great voice but it's a great single, a great record. Written as I recall by Les Reed and well worth hunting... and shooting."
  • It was also included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks released in 2003 under the title "Under The Influence". In that album's liner notes Morrissey wrote: "Diana Dors, too, is warm to the skin. The voice teeters with a knowing smile, but the heart is on the gravel as she tells us so much more than what she literally says, a double-tier of sexual urgency." and "She had the sexiest voice in world history. She is just a fantastic British figure and because she was so overtly sexual she was always underrated as an actress. She was decades before her time in standing up and saying, 'Yes, I enjoy sex', but her private life was over-recorded by the papers and it did not tally that someone so flamboyant could have depth too. This is Diana Dors' best recording: very sexual, very heaving, sort of string-drenched and very beautiful. You want to nestle in her bosom."
  • In the documentary "The Importance Of Being Morrissey" Morrissey is seen putting "So Little Time" on his record player.
  • The latter number was played during intermission on the third American leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • A clip of her was shown during intermission on the summer festivals leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • For more Diana Dors, have a look at the actors and actresses section of this chapter.

Dream Academy

  • According to biographer Simon Goddard, the latter cover was included on the interval tape on the Smiths' 1985 tour of Scotland.
  • In an interview published in Sounds magazine in 1988, Morrissey said "I liked the Dream Academy version of that old Smiths song [Please Please Please Let Me Get What I Want]. Everyone despised it and it got to number 81, which is nearly a hit."

du Pré, Jacqueline

  • She was mentioned by Morrissey as one of his favourite musicians in the 1991 Kill Uncle tourbook.
  • Her performance of Edward Elgar's Cello Concerto in E Major was played before the opening act on certain dates in the latter half of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.

Dusty, Slim

  • His song "The Pub With No Beer" was played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.

Eager, Vince

  • Morrissey supposedly considered using as etchings on the "Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me" single the lines "Eaten by Vince Eager" and "Vince Eager, Come And Get Me".
  • His song "The World's Loneliest Man" was mentioned in a list of Morrissey favourites titled "Singles To Be Cremated With" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.
  • In the September 1992 issue of Slitz, Morrissey said "Mister Eager was made from the same mould as Billy Fury. He released eight singles on the record company Top Rank. But the other seven are, honestly, completely impossible to listen to. (...) The title 'The Loneliest Man In The World' well, that’s pretty Morrisseyesque."
  • Morrissey used his name as an alias (when checking in hotels, etc.) in the early 1990s.

Easterhouse

Echobelly

  • Morrissey was seen at their concerts in 1994.
  • They were to be the support group for Morrissey's American gigs on the "Vauxhall & I" tour that never was.
  • Morrissey, in an interview to Raygun magazine in March 1994, when asked about new music he enjoys: "From here? I can't think of anything. Within England, certainly groups like the Blaggers and Gallon Drunk and Echobelly sound new to me it sounds as if I'm actually hearing something new. Which seems to be an impossible occurrence in America."
  • Their song "Give Her A Gun" was played during intermission on the 1995 dates promoting "Southpaw Grammar".
  • Morrissey appreciation for the band is mentioned in his "Autobiography".

Elcka

  • In an interview published in the 9 August 1997 issue of the Melody Maker Morrissey said: "They're astonishing. I went to see them recently and it was one of those gigs of a lifetime. One you never forget. They're really special."
  • They supported Morrissey extensively on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • In a statement to the True-To-You website in January 2006, looking back on past opening acts, Morrissey wrote: "I thought Elcka were great."

Elefant

  • They supported Morrissey twice in Los Angeles on 23 April and 24 April 2004.
  • They were invited to perform at the 2004 Meltdown festival which Morrissey curated.

Elgar, Edward

El Vez

  • He supported Morrissey at Coachella in 1999.
  • In an internet chat on KROQ.com in 1999, Morrissey said "I love El Vez. I wanted him to come to England and to Europe. He's influenced me greatly."
  • In an interview published in The Face in 1999, Morrissey answered the question "Your forthcoming UK tour has a Mexican theme. Why?" with the answer "Because I saw El Vez recently and I'd like to have a go at stealing all his ideas."

Eno, Brian

  • In a private letter to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet), Morrissey wrote "I have always considered 'Tiger Mountain' to be one of his best albums ever, and 'Warm Jets' is fab too." He praised the song "Backwater" in a different letter which was mailed with a photocopy of the cover of the "Before And After Science" album.
  • At some point he also mentioned appreciating his album "Before And After Science" as well (source?).
  • His songs "Here Come The Warm Jets", "Backwater", "Taking Tiger Mountain (By Strategy)" and "Dead Finks Don't Talk" were played during intermission on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour.
  • His song "Seven Deadly Finns" was played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • A video of the latter song, taken from Dutch television in 1974, was shown before Morrissey concerts on his 2014 tour.

Equals

  • In an interview given to Len Brown in 1997 for the "Brit Girls" series, Morrissey mentions loving this band in the 1960s.

Exuberants, The

  • They were slotted by Morrissey at #10 in a list of favourite Manchester musical artists published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME under the title "Moanchester, So Much To Answer For".

Faithfull, Marianne

  • Her song "Sha La La Song" was given by Morrissey to Marr on a tape soon after they met.
  • It is rumoured that early in their career the Smiths considered, or even attempted, to cover "Summer Nights" or "Sha La La Song".
  • According to the Meat Is Murder tour programme "Come And Stay With Me" was the first single Morrissey ever bought.
  • In an interview published in Jamming magazine in 1984 Morrissey said "My first record was Marianne Faithfull's 'Come Stay With Me' which I bought when I was very young. I remember it had a profound effect on me, and from that time, I was totally obsessed with all aspects of popular music."
  • Morrissey announced in a 1985 interview (source needed) that the Smiths were looking into a collaboration with Marianne Faithful. This unfortunately never materialised.
  • "Come And Stay With Me" was played during intermission on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.
  • According to a Marianne Faithfull interview, Morrissey also tried to contact her at some point during the 1990s.
  • In an interview for the Brit Girls documentary first broadcast late 1997 (UK, Channel 4), Morrissey said "The first single I ever bought, Marianne Faithfull's 'Come And Stay With Me' [...] it was 1965 and I still love it... it's a great record. I memorised the words and I would sing them very loudly. I thought she was incredible, I'm sure she still is, but then she was great. I was only six, I really didn't know what the words meant, I didn't know what she was singing about, certain lines I couldn't fathom at all. It was just something that was grabbing me in. It was the sound of her voice, the feel, the emotivemess and the freedom, and from that moment I just fell in love with pop music. I never stopped playing pop records. "
  • In a Q&A published in Mojo in 2004, when asked "What was the first record you bought, and where did you buy it?", Morrissey answered "'Come And Stay With Me' 7" single. I bought it in a shop in Moss Side called Paul Marsh. I didn't understand what she was singing, but I lost myself to it."
  • He requested that her cover of his song "Dear God, Please Help Me" be played when he was interviewed by Janice Long in October 2008.
  • Her cover of Morrissey's "Dear God Please Help Me" was played during intermission on a portion of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.
  • Her song "Come And Stay With Me" was chosen by Morrissey as one of his Desert Island Discs on his appearance on the BBC Radio4 show of that name in November 2009.
  • Morrissey mentions how "Come And Stay With Me" was the first ever record he purchased as a child, "after howls of insistence from beneath the kitchen table."

Fall, The

  • Morrissey mentioned the Fall as one of the most promising new Manchester bands in issue #7 of the Kids Stuff fanzine (July 1977).
  • In a private letter to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet), Morrissey mentioned that he liked their song "How I Wrote Elastic Man".
  • In an interview in late 1986 or early 1987 Morrissey chose the songs "Mr. Pharmacist" and "Living Too Late" among his favourites of 1986.
  • They were slotted by Morrissey at #8 in a list of favourite Manchester musical artists published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME under the title "Moanchester, So Much To Answer For".
  • Their song "Lie Dream Of A Casino Soul" was played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • It was also played during intermission on the 1995 Boxers tour.
  • The latter number was played again during intermission on the 2009 Tour Of Refusal and Swords Tour.

Fatima Mansions

  • Morrissey said in an interview to Les Inrockuptibles magazine that their album "Viva Dead Ponies" was his favourite of 1990.

Feathers, Charlie

  • He recorded a version of "Send Me The Pillow You Dream On", the title of which might have inspired a line in the Smiths' "Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others". However it is generally assumed that Morrissey would have been inspired by Johnny Tillotson's version of the song, or perhaps Dean Martin's.
  • His song "One Hand Loose" was played during intermission on the first American leg of the 1992 Your Arsenal tour (and perhaps more).
  • The latter title was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks released in 2003 under the title "Under The Influence". In that album's liner notes Morrissey wrote: "(...) the imagination chatters convulsively through Nat Couty's 'Woodpecker Rock', Charlie Feathers' 'one Hand Loose', Jimmy Radcliffe's 'The Forgotten Man', and Jay Bee Wasden's 'De Castro'. Of these last four, I would not pretend to know any background details, but the happiness these songs give me seems, now, to be everlasting - even if this is music played with a lop-sided grim, then please hook me."

Ferrick, Melissa

Ferrier, Kathleen

  • She was mentioned in a list of Morrissey's favourite singers titled "Bigmouths - The Singer Not The Song" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.

Fields, Gracie

  • In an interview printed in the 26 September 1987 issue of Melody Maker Morrissey said "The whole Gracie Fields, George Formby, Frank Randall mentality is one I completely worship. I adore those old Northern troupers and I'd love to be remembered as following in their tradition, but it seems doubtful I'll be remembered at all."
  • On four Northern dates on the British leg of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI the song "Trouble Loves Me" was preceded by a few bars from Gracie Fields' most famous song, "Sally", the theme from the 1931 film "Sally In Our Alley". While this was being played in Salford, seeing blank stares in the audience, Morrissey asked the audience "You've forgotten Gracie Fields haven't you? Shocking!"
  • In concert at the London Palladium on 28 May 2006 Morrissey mentioned some of the heroes who had motivated his choice of venue: "It's very very nailbiting to think that Sacha stood here and to think that Gracie Fields stood over there... as you'll remember..."

Flats

  • They opened for Morrissey on 4 dates of his 2011 tour.

Formby, George

  • George Formby is mentioned by Morrissey in private letters to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet).
  • In an interview to the NME in December 1984 Morrissey revealed "For me one of the greatest lyricists of all time is George Formby. His more obscure songs are so hilarious, the language was so flat and Lancastrian and always focused on domestic things. Not academically funny, not witty, just morosely humorous, and that really appeals to me."
  • In 1985 a poster of Morrissey in front of a picture of George Formby was given away with Smash Hits magazine.
  • In an interview to The Hit magazine published 5 October 1985 Morrissey said "His songs were total innuendo. I hate anything that's totally revealed... And I like his blunt, naive Northern element – the clumsy awkward little bugger who found everything enormously difficult. That has tremendous appeal for me..."
  • Morrissey voted Formby the greatest singer of 1985 in a NME poll.
  • Morrissey was photographed with Formby's banjo at his grave in 1986.

  • On the Queen Is Dead tour in 1986, the Smiths' intermission music played before gigs included his song "Why Don't Women Like Me?".
  • In an interview printed in the 26 September 1987 issue of Melody Maker Morrissey said "The whole Gracie Fields, George Formby, Frank Randall mentality is one I completely worship. I adore those old Northern troupers and I'd love to be remembered as following in their tradition, but it seems doubtful I'll be remembered at all."
  • The clouds seen on the reverse of Morrissey's "Viva Hate" album are a detail from a larger photograph of George Formby's father's grave.
  • Formby wrote songs filled with innuendo, including one titled "When I'm Cleaning Windows", which might have inspired Morrissey's "Roy's Keen".

Foundations

  • In an interview given to Len Brown in 1997 for the "Brit Girls" series, Morrissey mentions loving this band in the 1960s.
  • Their song "Mr. Personality Man" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • One of their songs was played before concerts on the 2009 Swords Tour. It may have been "Any Old Time (You're Lonely And Sad)"
  • Morrissey also at some point expressed his appreciation of their song "Build Me Up Buttercup". (source needed)
  • "Back On My Feet Again" was mentioned as an early favourite in Morrissey's autobiography.

Frank Chickens, The

Franz Ferdinand

  • They supported Morrissey at his birthday concert on 22 May 2004.
  • Their 2004 self-titled debut album was mentioned by Morrissey shortly before this as his favourite new release to French weekly Les Inrockuptibles.
  • A live version of their song "Jacqueline" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks titled "Songs To Save Your Life" given away with the 19 June 2004 issue of the NME. However, according to his "Autobiography", the decision to include this track may have been that of the NME who wanted more modern music on the compilation, as he had selected material that "date[d] back to the Roaring Twenties."

Furnish Time, The

  • In Madrid (and perhaps also in Barcelona) they supported the Smiths on their 1985 Meat Is Murder tour.

Fury, Billy

  • His song "I'll Never Quite Get Over You" was mentioned with nine other records in a list titled "Portrait Of The Artist As A Consumer", Morrissey's top ten films, symbolists, records and books published in the 17 September 1983 issue of the NME.
  • In an interview to Smash Hits in June 1984 Morrissey said "Billy Fury is virtually the same as James Dean. He was entirely doomed too and I find that quite affectionate. He was persistently unhappy and yet had a string of hit records. He was discovered working on the docks in Liverpool, was dragged to London, styled and forced to make records. He always wanted to make very emotionally over-blown ballads but he found himself in the midst of the popular arena. He despised almost every aspect of the music industry and was very, very ill from an early age. (...) Billy's singles are totally treasurable. I get quite passionate about the vocal melodies and the orchestration always sweeps me away. He always had such profound passion." Morrissey was seen holding a copy of Fury's "Halfway To Paradise" album in a photo accompanying the latter article.
  • On a radio programme called My Top Ten broadcast in October 1984 Morrissey played his song "I Will".
  • His song "Don't Jump" may have partly inspired the creation of "Shakespeare's Sister".
  • In "Yeahs And Yeuks", a list of loved and hated songs published in No.1 magazine in 1985, his song "I'll Never Quite Get Over You" was listed at #6 in the "yeahs" section.
  • In an interview published in The Face magazine in July 1987 Morrissey answered the question "Did you cry when Billy Fury died?" with the simple "Persistently. Loudly."
  • In a different interview (source needed) Morrissey said: "Like James Dean, I always saw Billy Fury as one of life's losers."
  • He is the cover star on the Smiths' final single "Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me" single. Incidently he himself had a single titled "Last Night Was Meant For Love".
  • In an interview published in the NME on 13 February 1988 Morrissey said about the Smiths' song "Paint A Vulgar Picture": "It was about the music industry in general, about practically anybody who's died and left behind that frenetic fanatical legacy which sends people scrambling. Billy Fury, Marc Bolan..."
  • His songs "Gonna Type A Letter" and "Halfway To Paradise" were played during intermission at various points into the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.
  • In an interview given to Len Brown in 1997 for the "Brit Girls" series, Morrissey said "The boy bands weren't terribly interesting to me. (...) the female singers seemed to be giving everything away and hiding nothing. Billy Fury was an exception but for the most part male voices were more restrained.
  • Fury recorded a song called "She Cried" which Morrissey may have had in mind when he wrote his own "He Cried".
  • A poster of what is believed to be Fury is seen behind Morrissey on the photo used as the cover of the "Oye Esteban" DVD compilation.
  • The title to the Smiths compilation album "The Sound Of the Smiths" was likely inspired by Billy fury's debut "The Sound Of Fury".

Gaber, Giorgio

  • His song "La Ballata Del Cerutti" was played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.

Gainsbourg, Serge and Brigitte Bardot

  • Their song "Bonnie And Clyde" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour and the 2000 Oye Esteban tour.
  • Their song "Initials B.B." was played during intermission on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour.
  • He requested that the latter song be played when he was interviewed by Janice Long in October 2008.
  • See also Brigitte Bardot.

Gallon Drunk

  • They supported Morrissey on the first American leg of the 1992 Your Arsenal tour.
  • In a radio interview to Modern Rock Live in 1992, Morrissey said that they were one of the two modern bands he was in love with, "something to become excited by".
  • Morrissey, in an interview to Raygun magazine in March 1994, when asked about new music he enjoys: "From here? I can't think of anything. Within England, certainly groups like the Blaggers and Gallon Drunk and Echobelly sound new to me it sounds as if I'm actually hearing something new. Which seems to be an impossible occurrence in America."

Garcia, Leo

  • His song called "Morrissey" was played during intermission on the 2002 tour and the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour.

Gene

  • Their song "Fighting Fit" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks titled "Songs To Save Your Life" given away with the 19 June 2004 issue of the NME. However, according to his "Autobiography", the decision to include this track may have been that of the NME who wanted more modern music on the compilation, as he had selected material that "date[d] back to the Roaring Twenties."
  • They were invited to perform at the 2004 Meltdown festival which Morrissey curated.
  • In an interview to Time Out magazine at the time Morrissey had this to say about them: "The press have always compared Gene to The Smiths to the point of dulling boredom, but there is so much more to be said about them that is never said. I saw them live in Los Angeles three or four years ago and the audience screamed hysterically throughout. These things matter."

General Johnson

  • He came in at #7 in a top 15 list of "most revered singers" put up on the True To You website on 1 January 2014, despite he or his band Chairmen Of The Board never having been mentioned as a favourite before.

Generation X

  • Their song "Wild Youth" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • Their song "Gimme Some Truth" was played during intermission on the 1999 Oye Esteban tour.

Girl In A Coma

  • Their song "Clumsy Sky" was played during intermission at various times on the Greatest Hits tour.
  • They supported Morrissey on the UK/France leg of the Greatest Hits tour.

Go-Betweens

  • Their song "Karen" features the line "Eskimo blood in my veins" which Morrissey reused in "Stretch Out And Wait".

Gorecki, Henryk

  • His Symphony No. 3 (aka Symphony Of Sorrowful Songs) was played after concerts on the 1995 Boxers tour.
  • A performance of the latter symphony closed the 2004 Meltdown Festival which Morrissey curated.
  • A recording of the latter symphony by the London Sinfonietta was included in a top 13 album list put up on the True-To-You website. The album didn't originally make the list when it was first published on thequietus.com in 2010, but it replaced a Roxy Music album in 2011 after Morrissey found out that band's lead singer Bryan Ferry was a fan of hunting.

Guillemots, The

  • They were picked by Morrissey as guests when he headlined the 2008 O2 Wireless Festival in London.

Hardy, Françoise

  • On a radio programme called My Top Ten broadcast in October 1984 Morrissey played her song "All Over The World".
  • In "Yeahs And Yeuks", a list of loved and hated songs published in No.1 magazine in 1985, her song "All Over The World" was listed at #7 in the "yeahs" section.
  • Her song "You Just Have To Say The Word" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • Morrissey also expressed his appreciation of her song "Another Place" at some point. (source needed)
  • She was invited to perform at the 2004 Meltdown Festival which Morrissey curated, but declined.

Harvey, PJ

  • She opened for Morrissey on a few dates at the end of the You Are The Quarry tour in 2004. His appreciation for Harvey must have disappeared because in a late 2013 missive to the True To You website, he deplored the fact that she supported fox hunting.

Heartbreakers, The
   See the New York Dolls.

Heartbreaks, The

  • They opened for Morrissey on 1 date of his 2011 tour.

Hebb, Bobby

  • It has been reported that Morrissey was looking for any cd featuring his song "Sunny" in 1999.

Heller, Bobby and His Orchestra with Bette Davis and Debbie Burton

  • Their song "Whatever Happened To Baby Jane" was played during intermission on the 2002 tour.

Herman's Hermits

  • Smiths bassist Andy Rourke recalls Morrissey playing Herman's Hermits in the tour bus.
  • The band was slotted by Morrissey at #2 in a list of favourite Manchester musical artists published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME under the title "Moanchester, So Much To Answer For".
  • Morrissey recorded and released his own version of their song "East West".
  • The band's original version of that song as well as "Mrs Brown You've Got A Lovely Daughter" and "Wonderful World" could also be heard in the intermission music played before gigs on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.

Hill, Benny

  • His song "Harvest Of Love" was played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.

Honeycombs, The

  • Their song "Something I Have To Tell You" was played during intermission on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.

Hopkins, Mary

  • Her version of Sparks' "Never Turn Your Back On Mother Earth" (titled "Mother Earth") was played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.

Houston, Thelma

  • Morrissey praised her version of his song "Suedehead" in a 2012 email interview with Metro.

(Howe, Julia Ward)

  • The first line in the Smiths' "These Things Take Time" is a variation on "Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord", the opening line of the famous Battle Hymn Of The Republic which she has written

Ian, Janis

  • Her 1972 song "Stars" includes the lines "perhaps pretending / you never saw the eyes / of grown men of twenty-five / who followed as you walked / and asked for autographs / or kissed you on the cheek / and you never could believe / they really loved you", which could have inspired the "grown man of twenty-five" line in "This Night Has Opened My Eyes" and perhaps the subject of "Paint A Vulgar Picture".
  • Morrissey discussed Janis Ian when he interviewed Joni Mitchell for Rolling Stone magazine in 1994.

Iggy And The Stooges

  • In an interview to KROQ on 6 July 1997 Morrissey requested that their song "Search And Destroy" be played. On the subject he said "A very L.A. song to me, don't you think? And did you remember EMF's version a few years ago? A very, very good version, I thought. A great song."
  • On the occasion of Friday the 13th August 2010, Morrissey sent to thequietus.com a list of his top 13 albums, which included Iggy And The Stooges' "Raw Power" at #5.

Inspiral Carpets

  • They were slotted by Morrissey at #7 in a list of favourite Manchester musical artists published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME under the title "Moanchester, So Much To Answer For".

Irwin, Big Dee (with Little Eva)

  • Their song "Swinging On A Star" was played during intermission on the 1995 Boxers tour.
  • The song was played over the credits at the end of the original television broadcast of a show from the latter tour. However it was replaced by another song on "Introducing Morrissey", the official video release of that broadcast.

Isaacs, Gregory

  • In 2004 when the reggae label Attack was given to Morrissey by Sanctuary Records, the man defended his love of reggae to naysayers by saying "I have a Gregory Isaacs seven-inch on my refrigerator".

Jam, The

  • Their song "That's Entertainment" was covered by Morrissey in 1991.
  • In a 1992 interview published in Slitz magazine, Morrissey said of his cover "It was a completely worthless version. I wanted to make it different from the original, but maybe I shouldn't have tried that. The original is a classic and Paul Weller is, when he wants to be, a genius. Hopefully we, Paul and I, will record a duet. I don’t know what song it will be yet. But if I’m lucky, he will appear at a huge gala in Finsbury Park where I perform in the beginning of August."

  • Their song "A Bomb In Wardour Street" was played at Morrissey's request during the 1994 HMV instores for the "Vauxhall & I" album.
  • Morrissey said in an interview to KROQ radio in July 1997, as he was requesting that they play their song "A Town Called Malice", that the band was "another great British group" and the song was a "timeless record".

James

  • They supported the Smiths on a late 1984 Irish leg of the debut album tour and on the extensive British leg of the Meat Is Murder tour in early 1985. They had before that opened for the Smiths at the Manchester Hacienda on 24 November 1983.
  • Morrissey mentioned in 1985's Meat Is Murder tour programme that James was one of his favourite bands.
  • The Smiths covered their song "What's The World" on a mini tour of Scotland in September 1985.
  • A live recording from Glasgow on that tour was later released by the band as a b-side.
  • They were slotted by Morrissey at #4 in a list of favourite Manchester musical artists published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME under the title "Moanchester, So Much To Answer For".
  • It is generally assumed that Morrissey's "We Hate It When Our Friends Become Successful" from 1992 is about James who started out opening for the Smiths but eventually became more successful than them (at least sales-wise), particularly at the time that song was written.

Jet Black Machine

Jobriath

  • Morrissey had letters praising this obscure '70s glam singer (who was to be America's answer to David Bowie) printed in the 27 December 1975 issue of Sounds magazine, the 11 November 1976 issue of Melody Maker and the 27 October 1979 issue of Sounds.
  • In a private letter to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet), Morrissey said that he still "dribbled" over Jobriath.
  • He was included by Morrissey in a list of favourite people titled "Odd Fellows" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.
  • The "Creatures Of The Street" album is very briefly seen in the video for "Pregnant For The Last Time".
  • On the cover of the Japanese "My Love Life" single released in 1991, Morrissey musicians Gary Day and Alain Whyte are seen holding a copy of the latter album.
  • Morrissey supposedly tried to have Jobriath open for him on his 1992 Your Arsenal Tour, but he found out that he had died of AIDS complications in 1983, in complete obscurity.
  • The Jobriath song "Heartbeat" was played during intermission on the 1995 dates promoting "Southpaw Grammar".
  • In the mid-to-late 1990s Morrissey tried to have his music reissued on compact disc. In 2004 he finally was able to have a compilation album of his best material ("Lonely Planet Boy") and a single ("I Love A Good Fight") released on his own Attack label. He wrote in the liner notes of the latter compilation, "Thirty years on [Jobriath] is no less an insoluble mystery and the songs remain hugely enjoyable."
  • One of his albums was played before the opening act on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour.
  • His songs "Morning Starship", "I Love A Good Fight" and perhaps "I'm A Man" were played during intermission on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour.
  • "Morning Starship" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks titled "Songs To Save Your Life" given away with the 19 June 2004 issue of the NME.
  • At the 2004 Meltdown festival which he curated Morrissey tried to put together a Jobriath tribute concert with Elton John, but this never came through.
  • Morrissey's band members are seen wearing Jobriath t-shirts designed by Morrissey in a photo taken on the You Are The Quarry tour which appears in the booklet of the live album "Live At Earls Court".
  • In a Morrissey Q&A posted on website True-To-You in January 2006 Morrissey was questioned about his favourite Jobriath songs and answered "My favourite is 'Morning Starship,' but I like them all - with the exception of 'Rock Of Ages,' which is a bit hard to take."
  • On the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI and on parts of the 2007 Greatest Hits tour Morrissey took the stage following his song "What A Pretty".
  • His song "Street Corner Love" was played before concerts at the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • His songs "Morning Starship" and "Dietrich/Fondyke" were played during intermission at various points into the Greatest Hits tour.
  • When invited to play his favourite bands on KCRW's Guest DJ Project in August 2008, Morrissey chose his song "Morning Starship".
  • He requested that "Morning Starship" be played when he was interviewed by Janice Long in October 2008.
  • A video montage tribute of Jobriath footage was shown during intermission on portions of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.
  • On the occasion of Friday the 13th August 2010, Morrissey sent to thequietus.com a list of his top 13 albums, which included Jobriath's self-titled debut at #13.
  • Morrissey's discovery of Jobriath's music is covered in his autobiography. He talks about wanting to have him as a support artist around 1991-1992, and discovering that the singer had already been dead for 10 years. He also talks about releasing some of his music in 2004 on his vanity label Attack.

John Butler Trio

  • They supported Morrissey three times in Australia on the 2002 tour.

Johnson Family, The

  • They supported Morrissey on a few dates on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.

Jolson, Al

  • His 1929 song "Sonny Boy" is credited on the Smiths' debut album for having provided the line "Climb upon my knee, sonny boy" and more to "The Hand That Rocks The Cradle". Here are some of the song's lyrics: "Climb upon my knee, Sonny Boy / You are only three, Sonny Boy / You've no way of knowing, There's no way of showing / What you mean to me, Sonny Boy ...When I'm old and gray, dear, promise you won't stray, dear / For I love you so, Sonny Boy ... Let me hold you nearer, One thing makes you dearer / You've your mother's eyes, Sonny Boy".
  • This is very likely to be a coincidence, but Al Jolson also had a song titled "Where The Black Eyed Susans Grow" and Morrissey recorded a song titled "Black Eyed Susan".

Jones, Jimmy

  • In an interview to Select magazine published in July 1991, Morrissey said "Tonight (...) I will listen to a record which I can't stop playing at the moment, a single called 'Good Timin'' by Jimmy Jones - an old American MGM yellow label record. It's just simple, straight, boring, dull, floppy old pop music, but to me it's... (he lowers his voice to a whisper) it's like skin against skin. It's better than fine cuisine. It's better than sex! There, now, that's how I feel."
  • In his autobiography Morrissey wrote that as a child, "I discover Good Timin' by Jimmy Jones, and I am beginning to feel something that no one else has brought to my attention."
  • He came in at #6 in a top 15 list of "most revered singers" put up on the True To You website on 1 January 2014.

Jones, Paul

  • His song "I've Been A Bad, Bad Boy" includes the line "I'm not the man you think I am", possibly the source for the same line in "Pretty Girls Make Graves".
  • That song was mentioned in a list of Morrissey favourites titled "Singles To Be Cremated With" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.
  • On the occasion of re-release of "EVeryday Is Like Sunday", Morrissey's Facebook page created a Spotify playlist of Morrissey 'Supreme 13 Singles' which included Paul Jones' "I've Been a Bad, Bad Boy".

Jones, Rickie Lee

  • The line "He tried living in a world, and in a shell" from her song "The Last Chance Texaco" was a very likely inspiration for the similar one in "Shoplifters Of The World Unite".
  • According to Morrissey drummer (1988-1991) Andrew McGibbon aka Andrew Paresi, the creation of "Late Night Maudlin Street" was influenced by Rickie's "Last Chance Texaco".

Jones, Tom

  • His song "What's New Pussycat" was played during intermission on the third American leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • "Thunderball", the John Barry Orchestra collaboration with Tom Jones, was played before concerts during portions of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.
  • In an interview to Radionica (Columbia) in early 2012, Morrissey mentioned Tom Jones as one of the artists he loved the most, and even said that he would like to sing "If I Can Dream" with him.
  • Jones was a special guest for a Morrissey concert in Los Angeles on 10 May 2014

June Brides

Killers, The

  • They supported Morrissey twice in Los Angeles (22 April and 27 April) and once in Chicago (17 July) on the You Are The Quarry tour in 2004.
  • Their song "Jenny Was A Friend Of Mine" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks titled "Songs To Save Your Life" given away with the 19 June 2004 issue of the NME. However, according to his "Autobiography", the decision to include this track may have been that of the NME who wanted more modern music on the compilation, as he had selected material that "date[d] back to the Roaring Twenties."

King Cheetah

Kinks

  • Their song "Dandy" was played during intermission on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.
  • Morrissey had his band rehearse their song "Harry Rag" in late 1991, he seemed to have been planning to release his own cover of it, but this never materialised.
  • Morrissey once said that he or the Smiths were from a lineage of truly british bans like The Kinks. (source needed)
  • Morrissey: "Certainly, Ray Davies has been a great influence on me. I think his view of England has been pretty accurate and very melodious, very comforting". (source needed)

Konstantinos B

Körberg, Tommy

  • His 1969 Eurovision Song Contest entry "Judy min vän" was played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • A video of him performing that song was shown between opening act and Morrissey on live dates from the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • "Judy min vän" was played during intermission on the UK/France leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • The latter song was also mentioned as an early favourite in Morrissey's autobiography.

(Lang, Andrew)

  • The line "But me and my true love will never meet again" from the traditional Scottish hymn "The Bonnie Bonnie Banks Of Loch Lomond" (words by Andrew Lang) was recycled by Morrissey in the Smiths' "Paint A Vulgar Picture".
  • On Scottish dates early in the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI Morrissey's "Trouble Loves Me" was preceded by a few lines from that hymn.

Leyton, John

  • His song "Johnny, Remember Me" was mentioned with nine other records in a list titled "Portrait Of The Artist As A Consumer", Morrissey's top ten films, symbolists, records and books published in the 17 September 1983 issue of the NME.
  • Morrissey chose the latter song to be featured on his October 1984 appearance on the My Top Ten radio programme.
  • In "Yeahs And Yeuks", a list of loved and hated songs published in No.1 magazine in 1985, his song "Johnny Remember Me" was listed at #5 in the "yeahs" section.

Libertines

  • They supported Morrissey at London's Brixton Academy on 5 November 2002.
  • Their song "Time For Heroes" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks titled "Songs To Save Your Life" given away with the 19 June 2004 issue of the NME. However, according to his "Autobiography", the decision to include this track may have been that of the NME who wanted more modern music on the compilation, as he had selected material that "date[d] back to the Roaring Twenties."

Linder Sterling
   See Ludus.

Lotis, Dennis

  • In an interview published in Rorschach Magazine in late 1983/early 1984 Morrissey mentioned that he was quite fond of crooners such as Johnny Ray, Frank Sinatra and Denis Lotus [sic].

Love Affair

  • In an interview given to Len Brown in 1997 for the "Brit Girls" series, Morrissey mentions loving this band in the 1960s.
  • Their song "Rainbow Valley" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • The latter song was also mentioned as an early favourite in Morrissey's autobiography.

Lovesick

Lovetones, The

Ludus / Linder Sterling

  • Ludus' lead singer Linder Sterling is one of Morrissey's oldest friend. Their friendship started many years before the formation of the Smiths. They lived together at some point in Whalley Range, and it is speculated that early Smiths numbers "Miserable Lie" (which mentions Whalley Range) and "Wonderful Woman" (and perhaps even "Jeane") are about her. As if to add weight to these speculations, Morrissey once introduced Linder as a 'wonderful woman' on stage on 18 September 2002 and quoted the "Whalley Range" line from "Miserable Lie" in a 2006 essay for her 2006 art retrospective.
  • In a private letter to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet), Morrissey mentioned the Ludus song "My Cherry Is In The Sherry" as one his favourites of that moment.
  • From May 1980 to August 1981 Morrissey sent to UK music papers like the Record Mirror at least 3 reviews in which he praised the band.
  • One chapter in Morrissey's book "James Dean Is Not Dead" was given as a title a quote from Linder.
  • Morrissey wrote a press release for the band Ludus in 1982.
  • Their cover of Brigitte Bardot's "Nue Au Soleil" was voted by Morrissey as his favourite single of 1984 (despite the song having been released two years before).
  • Ludus were mentioned by Morrissey in 1985's Meat Is Murder tour programme as one of his favourite bands.
  • In 1985 Morrissey wrote sleevenotes for a Ludus compilation album that ended up being shelved: "Ludus lay on us the decorative impulses of their music, and nowhere more significantly than on the volume which now lies before you. People who know real genius will love this record... Her singing leaves me out of breath... Linder went to Brussels and I remained stuck in Manchester, battling with the tides of fortune. Our shrill spirits still slide through the ugly streets of Manchester, always wet through, always caught out, always spectating, our hearts damaged by too many air-raids."
  • The 'other person' in the Smiths' "Cemetry Gates" is believed to be Linder.
  • Morrissey considered using the line "Linda found a cobra" as the etched run-out groove message for the "Girlfriend In A Coma" single, but changed his mind.
  • Ludus were slotted by Morrissey at #5 in a list of favourite Manchester musical artists published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME under the title "Moanchester, So Much To Answer For".
  • Linder sang backing vocals on Morrissey's 1991 song "Driving Your Girlfriend Home".
  • Linder followed Morrissey on tour in 1991 as a photographer. She published the following year a book of photographs from that tour under the title "Morrissey Shot". Some of these photos were used for the covers of the albums "Your Arsenal" and "Beethoven Was Deaf", and singles "We Hate It When Our Friends Become Successful", "You're The One For Me Fatty", "Tomorrow" and "Certain People I Know".
  • Linder also took photos of Morrissey while he was on stage on a few dates in 2002. On one of these, 18 September 2002, he even introduced her to the audience as his "lifelong friend" and as "a wonderful woman".
  • Ludus' song "The Fool" was played during intermission on the 2002 tour.
  • Because she was misrepresented in the script for the 2002 film "24 Hour Party People", Morrissey refused to appear in it and refused the makers the use of the song "This Charming Man".
  • Ludus' song "Breaking The Rules" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks released in 2003 under the title "Under The Influence". In that album's liner notes Morrissey wrote: "Gliding in without oars, Ludus belong to the sea. Linder comes into position against the light, at double-sail, holding her words prepared. The weight of despair lifts like a deceptive fog only because the voice sings. 'Breaking The Rules' might appear to be a statement, but like all Ludus songs, it is really a question laid out like a statement. This is the delightfully recurring now-that-you've-got-me-where-I-want-you Linder trick. I want to be caught. Linder's tags of verse offer advice, strength, warmth, sustenance and inspiration, as she sings - not roughly, but firmly. I want to be caught twice. My mouth cannot close whilst 'Breaking The Rules' plays."
  • Morrissey also stated in an interview given to Word magazine in 2003: "Linder has an enormously sexual voice and is also enormously underrated(...) I find these lyrics remarkable, suggesting that all forms of love are wonderful, whether it's three women together, four men together. Why can it not be so?"
  • Linder contributed to the 2003 documentary "The Importance Of Being Morrissey". She had previously contributed to another documentary, 1987's installment of the South Bank Show about the Smiths.
  • Ludus' song "Let Me Go Where My Pictures Go" was played during intermission on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour.
  • "Let Me Go Where My Pictures Go" was also included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks titled "Songs To Save Your Life" given away with the 19 June 2004 issue of the NME.
  • Ludus was invited to reform for the 2004 Meltdown festival which Morrissey curated. In an interview to Time Out magazine at the time Morrissey had this to say: "Linder is Ann-Margret on her motorcycle 10km outside St Tropez. Everything she sings about is by way of a last word sensual and robust."
  • Linder, speaking about Morrissey in an interview published on 6 June 2004 in the Independent on Sunday: "With Ludus I sang, 'I steal your books and you steal mine'. It was, of course, about him."
  • Linder filmed the interviews appearing in Morrissey's live DVD "Who Put The 'M' In Manchester".
  • In a Q&A published in Uncut magazine in 2006, Morrissey answered the question "Damien Hurst or Tracy Emin?" with "Linder Sterling".
  • The Ludus song "Breaking The Rules" was played during intermission music on the third American leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • Morrissey interviewed Linder for the March 2010 issue of Interview magazine.
  • Unsurprisingly, Morrissey mentions his friendship with Linder in his autobiography. He credits her as being the inspiration behind the title for "Still Ill".

Lulu

  • In a private letter to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet), Morrissey mentioned being particularly found of Lulu's "To Sir With Love".
  • Her song "Boom-Bang-A-Bang" was played during intermission on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.
  • When asked to perform at the Amnesty International 30th Birthday Party Morrissey agreed under the condition that he would be introduced by Lulu.
  • In an interview for the Brit Girls documentary first broadcast late 1997 (UK, Channel 4), Morrissey said: "Yes I am, I am [a massive fan]. I can point to her errors but that's just the kind of person I am. I think she's also the most well-balanced of that glut of female singers of that time. She's a very nice person, a very natural and open person, which doesn't help in this business. There's no showbizness or flamboyancy about her, and she made some great records! 'Dreary Days And Dreary Nights' is obviously a floor filler... in my house. You will giggle but 'I'm A Tiger' I thought was an expertly crafted piece of genius gibberish. And 'To Sir With Love', which was a b-side in this country... You think they're really disposable but if you really listen they are wittily crafted pieces of work. 'Boom Bang-A-Bang'? These are records that we might not even be bothered to burn but there is a cleverness, there is a craft. Maybe it's only people like me who sees it but... who cares." Her song "The Boat That I Row" is also mentioned in that interview.
  • "I'm A Tiger" was mentioned as an early favourite and "a brilliant slab of froth" in Morrissey's autobiography.

MacColl, Kirsty

  • She sang back-up vocals on the Smiths' "Ask" and "Golden Lights", and Morrissey's "Interesting Drug". In 1985 she had been invited to sing backup on early demos of "Bigmouth Strikes Again", but this collaboration was never released.
  • She supported Morrissey in London on 19 December 1992. She then included a cover of the Smiths' "You Just Haven't Earned It Yet Baby" in her set.
  • In the sleeve notes for her "Galore" compilation, Morrissey wrote "Kirsty is a voice gradually added to a body. She has great songs and a crackin' bust. She is a supreme original, although not - as far as i know - one of the original Supremes. Everything shows in the voice. The best of the last of. Furthermore, a full set of teeth. What more? NOT cursed."
  • She sang backing vocals on Morrissey's "I'd Love To" but she wasn't credited for it.
  • Morrissey's friendship and love for MacColl is discussed in his "Autobiography".

Mackay, Andy

  • 'Eddie Riff', a pseudonym Morrissey has be known to use, was taken from the title of this artist's 1974 album 'In Search Of Eddie Riff'.
  • The sleeve design for Morrissey's "Your Arsenal" album was credited to Andy Mackay, but this was another one of Morrissey's pseudonyms.
  • Mackay was a member of Roxy Music (see further down this list).

MacKenzie, Billy

  • The Smiths song "William It Was Really Nothing" is rumoured to be about Associates singer Billy Mackenzie (although there is zero evidence to that effect). Mackenzie wrote a riposte titled "Stephen You're Really Something" in 1993, but the song remained unreleased until 2000.
  • When MacKenzie took his life in early 1997, Morrissey stated in the 1 February 1997 issue of Melody Maker "He was such a lovely person, and I feel very, very sad."

MacNee, Patrick and Honor Blackman

  • Their song "Kinky boots" was played during intermission on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.

Madness

  • Morrissey collaborated with Madness producers Clive Langer and Alan Winstanley from 1989 to 1991.
  • Madness lead singer Suggs sang back vocals on Morrissey's 1990 single "Piccadilly Palare" and its b-side "Get Off The Stage".
  • Madness bassist Bedders played on the 1991 album "Kill Uncle" and its subsequent singles "Pregnant For The Last Time" and "My Love Life".
  • The song "You're The One For Me, Fatty" was supposedly written with Madness member Cathal Smyth (aka Chas Smash) in mind. Smyth also speculates that he might also be the inspiration for lines in "Certain People I Know". He sang back-up on Morrissey's cover of "That's Entertainment" and befriended Morrissey in 1991-1992.
  • Morrissey supported Madness in 1992 at the Madstock festival.
  • In the video for Morrissey's 1992 single "We Hate In When Our Friends Become Successful", the little picture of a man in a suit and a bowler hat was taken from the video for Madness' "Cardiac Arrest".

Magazine / Howard Devoto / Luxuria

  • During the short time when the Nosebleeds were fronted by Morrissey, they supported Magazine at Manchester's Ritz in May 1978. It was about that time or shortly after that Magazine frontman Howard Devoto and Morrissey became acquainted through mutual friend Linder Sterling (see Ludus above)
  • In a private letter to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet), Morrissey wrote "Presently in mourning over the death of Magazine. So tragic. My life will change. Have you heard their "About The Weather"? Go out and buy it at once." In different letters to the same penpal, he mentions that he particularly likes the Magazine song "Sweetheart Contract", namedrops Devoto's name and quoted from their lyrics ("I am angry, I am ill, and I'm ugly as sin").
  • The latter line from Magazine's "A Song From Under The Floorboards" very likely inspired the similar one in the Smiths' "Accept Yourself".
  • Morrissey remained friends with Devoto throughout the Smiths days, and soon after the Smiths split up, the pair were joint guests on Radio 1's Singled Out programme where they reviewed new singles.
  • Morrissey joined his friend Howard Devoto and his new band Luxuria on stage on 13 March 1988 at the Town & Country and read from the Proust classic "À la recherche du temps perdu" ("Remembrance Of Things Past").
  • Magazine were slotted by Morrissey at #6 in a list of favourite Manchester musical artists published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME under the title "Moanchester, So Much To Answer For".
  • In an interview to KROQ on 6 July 1997 Morrissey requested that their song "About The Weather" be played. On the subject he said "Magazine are an overlooked Manchester group. In assessments of Manchester, they never mention Magazine. I don't know why. An excellent group, very strong, and this was the first single in England that really had attention. Great lyrics."
  • Their spoken piece "The Book" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour. This was also the case on one later date, Tulsa Oklahoma on 13 March 2006 at the very beginning of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • Morrissey recorded and released his own version of "A Song From Under The Floorboards" in 2006.
  • The Magazine song "I Love You You Big Dummie" was played during intermission on the third American leg of the Greatest Hits tour.

Maker, James

  • James Maker's friendship with Morrissey goes back to before the formation of the Smiths. It is extensively discussed in his autobiography.
  • Morrissey dedicated his book The New York Dolls, "For Jimmy, who lives it."
  • He was on stage as a dancer for the band's first two concerts.
  • Maker put together his own band called Raymonde in the mid-1980s and they supported the Smiths on most of the British leg of the Queen Is Dead tour.
  • Raymonde's eponymous song "Raymonde" was played during intermission on the 1995 dates promoting "Southpaw Grammar".
  • The Raymonde song "No One Can Hold A Candle To You" was featured on Morrissey's compilation of his favourite tracks titled "Songs To Save Your Life" given away with the 19 June 2004 issue of the NME.
  • Morrissey recorded and released his own version of Raymonde's "No One Can Hold A Candle To You" in 2004.
  • Morrissey released a James Maker single on his Attack label in October 2004. The single featured the songs "Born That Way" and "I'm Unbearable".
  • Both the latter songs as well as Raymonde's original version of "No One Can Hold A Candle To You" were played during intermission on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour.
  • Maker was invited to perform at the Morrissey-curated Meltdown Festival in 2004. In an interview to Time Out magazine at the time Morrissey had this to say: "The new songs of James Maker are rare powerful instruments. He's been through Raymonde in the '80s and RPLA in the'90s but has never been better than he is now. He isn't like anybody else and prefers to be categorised as something for which there is, as yet, no name. Brilliant, funny, and like an enchanting blow to the lower belly."
  • James Maker also opened for Morrissey on a few dates at the end of the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour.
  • In a Q&A published in Uncut magazine in 2006, Morrissey answered the question "Ian Brown or Ian Curtis?" with "Neither. James Maker instead."
  • The James Maker song "Born That Way" was played before concerts at the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • Morrissey, in a Q&A session on the True-To-You website in June 2007: "'No One Can Hold A Candle to You' was originally written and sung by James Maker, and we've been good friends now for 30 years. He released 'Born that Way' a couple of years back and that's one of my favorite recordings of all time."
  • In a 2012 email interview to news.com.au, Morrissey said "'Born That Way' by James Maker is the greatest single of the last decade".
  • Morrissey talks about his friendship with James Makers and praises Raymonde's self-titled album and his "Born This Way" single in his "Autobiography".

Mancini, Henry and Johnny Mercer

  • His song "Moonriver" written for the movie "Breakfast At Tiffany's" was recorded and released by Morrissey.

Marion

  • They supported Morrissey on all bar one date of the Boxers tour.

Marmozets

  • This band claims to have received in April 2014 a personal message from Morrissey saying that he loved their music.

Mars, Johnny

  • This singer who's name is very close to Johnny Marr's released in 1972 a song titled "Meet Me In The Alley", which may or may not have inspired Morrissey when he wrote the words to "I Want The One I Can't Have".

Martino, Al

  • Morrissey requested that his song "Rachel" be played when he was interviewed by Janice Long in October 2008.
  • His song "Granada" was played before concerts on portions of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal and on the Swords Tour later the same year.
  • On the occasion of re-release of "EVeryday Is Like Sunday", Morrissey's Facebook page created a Spotify playlist of Morrissey 'Supreme 13 Singles' which included Al Martino's "Granada".
  • Morrissey praised Martino in his "Autobiography".
  • He came in at #1 in a top 15 list of "most revered singers" put up on the True To You website on 1 January 2014.

Marvelettes

  • When Morrissey and Marr first met, Morrissey asked Johnny to pick a song out of his box of 7" singles, and he picked "You're The One", the b-side to their "Paper Boy" single.
  • Their song "Paper Boy" was mentioned with nine other records in a list titled "Portrait Of The Artist As A Consumer", Morrissey's top ten films, symbolists, records and books published in the 17 September 1983 issue of the NME.
  • The song made another list, this one broadcast on a radio programme called My Top Ten in October 1984.
  • Their song "Strange, I Know" was mentioned in a list of Morrissey favourites titled "Singles To Be Cremated With" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.
  • The title of their song "You're The One For Me, Bobby" must have inspired "You're The One For Me, Fatty".
  • Similarly, the title of their song "Used To Be A Playboy" might have inspired "Used To Be A Sweet Boy".
  • The Marvelettes' lead singer Gladys Horton was mentioned by Morrissey as one of his favourite singers in an interview to Raygun magazine in March 1994.
  • Their song "Anything You Wanna Do" was played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • "Anything You Wanna Do" was also played during intermission on the 1995 Boxers tour and the 1995 dates promoting "Southpaw Grammar".

McAlmont (David McAlmont)

  • He supported Morrissey on the final date of the Boxers tour at the Brixton Academy.

Melsen, Monique

  • Her 1971 Eurovision Song Contest entry "Pomme, pomme, pomme" was played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.

Melson, Lee Red

  • His song "Carmen Sue Rock" was played during intermission early on the Greatest Hits tour.

Mercurys, The

  • They supported Morrissey in Birmingham on the 1992 Your Arsenal tour.

Micro

Mitchell, Joni

  • The lines "Last night the ghost of my old ideals reran on channel five" and "I came out two days on your tail" from her song "Don Juan Reckless Daughter" are very likely inspirations for similar lines found in "Shoplifters Of The World Unite" and "Half A Person".
  • "Another false alarm" from "Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me" was borrowed from her song "Amelia".
  • "I love the romance of crime" from Morrissey's "Sister I'm A Poet" was also taken on loan from "Don Juan Reckless Daughter" ("They love the romance of the crime").
  • According to Morrissey drummer (1988-1991) Andrew McGibbon aka Andrew Paresi, the creation of "Late Night Maudlin Street" was influenced by Joni's "The Hissing Of Summer Lawns".
  • Some lines from Morrissey's "Seasick Yet Still Docked" were obviously inspired by "I am a poor wayfaring stranger / traveling through all these highs and lows / wish i had the wings / of Noah's pretty little white dove / I would fly this raging river to reach the one i love / if I'd only seen through the silky veils of ardor / what a killing crime this love can be" from her song "The Silky Veils Of Ardor".
  • In 1997 Mitchell agreed to give an interview to Rolling Stone magazine only if Morrissey was the one asking the questions. This interview was published in the 6 March (#755) issue of that year. The audio of the interview was shortly after sent to radio stations as a promotional tool. In the interview Morrissey told Joni that she was "the greatest lyricist that has ever lived" and "very underrated".
  • Her song "The Jungle Line", which mentions "a low-cut blouse" and "a working girl like her", must have inspired a few lines in Morrissey's "Maladjusted".

Mizell, Hank

  • His song "Jungle Rock" was played during intermission on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour and early on the 2007 Greatest Hits tour.

Mona

  • They opened for Morrissey on 2 dates of his 2011 tour.

Monochrome Set

  • In a private letter to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet), Morrissey praised their "Strange Boutique" and "Love Zombies" albums and the song "Lester Leaps In". Morrissey: "How can anyone get through life without the dear, cuddly Monochrome Set?" He also transcribed a verse of their song "Ici Les Enfants" in one of these letters.
  • It is speculated that Morrissey's love of the Monochrome Set might have been one of the reasons why the Smiths signed with Rough Trade Records in 1983 (they had released three singles on the label a few years before the creation of the Smiths).

Monro, Matt

  • His song "Charade" was played during intermission on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour.
  • The latter was also probably heard before concerts at the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • "We're Gonna Change The World" was mentioned as an early favourite in Morrissey's autobiography.
  • He came in at #12 in a top 15 list of "most revered singers" put up on the True To You website on 1 January 2014.

Morricone, Ennio

  • He provided string arrangements on Morrissey's 2006 song "Dear God Please Help Me".
  • When questioned about working with Morricone in a Q&A published on the True-To-You website in November 2005 Morrissey answered "Yes, the Maestro came into the studio with his orchestra and worked on a song called "Dear God Please Help Me" – which was very flattering because he'd turned so many multi-million selling pop acts down (I won't mention their names – U2, David Bowie, etc.), so I was delighted that he said yes to scruffy old me. In the event, he was very shy, and he was heavily surrounded and shielded, and there was no way that he and I would end up at the local pub playing darts. But – that's OK. Life's rich tapestry, and so on."

Morrisseys, The

  • It is very unlikely that this folk band ever had any influence on Morrissey, but they do have a song called "I Will Never Marry" while Morrissey has one simply titled "Will Never Marry".

Motels, The

  • In an interview with Richard Kedzior published online in early 2009, the latter says Morrissey was a fan of the band The Motels in 1980. A photo of a very young Morrissey with the Motels' lead singer was also published alongside the interview.

Mott The Hoople

  • Their song "Honaloochie Boogie" was played during intermission on the third American leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • Their song "Sea Diver" was chosen by Morrissey as one of his Desert Island Discs on his appearance on the BBC Radio4 show of that name in November 2009.
  • Morrissey talks about his teenage love of Mott The Hoople in his autobiography. Amongst other things, he mentions playing "All The Young Dudes" his father.
  • A video of Mott The Hooople was shown before Morrissey concerts on his 2014 tour.

Mr Bloe

  • Their song "Groovin' With Mr Bloe" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour and the 1999 Oye Esteban tour.
  • "Groovin' With Mr Bloe" was also mentioned by Morrissey in an interview given during the American leg of the "Maladjusted" tour to Swedish Magazine Pop (published in January 1998 issue).
  • When invited to play his favourite bands on KCRW's Guest DJ Project in August 2008, Morrissey chose the song "Groovin' With Mr Bloe".
  • On the occasion of re-release of "Everyday Is Like Sunday", Morrissey's Facebook page created a Spotify playlist of Morrissey 'Supreme 13 Singles' which included "Groovin' With Mr Bloe".

Newley, Anthony

  • His song "Girls Were Made To Love And Kiss" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • His song "Strawberry Fair" was played during intermission on the 1999 Oye Esteban tour.
  • A video of him performing "I'm The Boy You Should Say Yes To" was shown between opening act and Morrissey on dates from the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI, on the Greatest Hits tour and on the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.
  • For more Anthony Newley, have a look at the Under The Influence: actors section.

Newton-John, Olivia

  • Her 1974 Eurovision Song Contest entry "Long Live Love" was played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI. Morrissey was going through a Eurovision 'phase' at the time and it is very likely that song was selected for that reason and not because Morrissey has any particular fondness for Olivia Newton-John.
  • When questioned about lasting musical influences in a Q&A published on the True-To-You website in November 2005 Morrissey joked: "The royal three remain the same: The New York Dolls, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, with Nico standing firm as first reserve. Oh, and Olivia Newton-John."

New York Dolls

  • Morrissey had many letters in which the New York Dolls (and later projects by David Johansen and Johnny Thunders/The Heartbreakers) were praised printed in various music magazines and fanzines published between September 1975 and November 1977. The ads section of a December 1976 issue of Sounds includes one where "Dolls / Patti fans wanted for Manchester-based punk band".
  • Their then-unreleased song "Teenage News" was rehearsed by the Nosebleeds during the short period in 1978 when Morrissey was part of the (remains of that) band. The decision to tackle this cover was of course Morrissey's.
  • Before becoming famous Morrissey published a biography of the band simply titled The New York Dolls and was the UK president of their fan club (although he denied the latter fact at some point in time). The New York Dolls were among the very first bands that he saw play live.
  • A chapter in "James Dean Is Not Dead" - another book Morrissey published - was given the title "Lonely Planet Boy", also the title of a New York Dolls song.
  • In a private letter to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet), Morrissey praised their song "Frankenstein".
  • Morrissey in interview (source info needed), about seeing them for the first time: "I was thirteen and it was my first real emotional experience. The next day I was twenty-nine. The Dolls gave me a sense of uniqueness, as if they were my own personal discovery."
  • Morrissey, in an interview published in the 16 February 1984 issue of Smash Hits: "Five years ago I would have lain on the tracks for them. Now I could never possibly listen to one of their records."
  • In an interview published in Melody Maker on 3 November 1984 Morrissey said: "It was just a teenage fascination and I was laughably young at the time. I always like the Dolls because they seemed like the kind of group the industry couldn't wait to get rid of. And that pleased me tremendously. I mean, there wasn't anybody around then with any dangerous qualities so I welcomed them completely. Sadly, their solo permutations crushed whatever image I had of them as individuals. Now I think they're absolute stenchers. "
  • In an April 1985 interview to Australian radio Morrissey said "(...)The music industry hated them and that was good enough for me. I thought well, yes, that's the group for me. The music industry couldn't wait to get rid of the New York Dolls, they were quite clamorous and raucous so many people said they couldn't actually play, which was not entirely true. But you must remember throughout the periods of '73 and '74 when they existed, they were quite dank times and they were very... they were quite stylish times almost in a... offensively stylish, should I say, and the New York Dolls were just the antidote to everything we find and I thought that was wonderful (...) I think they were the single most important group to me as an adolescent."
  • In an interview published in The Face in 1985, Morrissey said "It was the New York Dolls who were the real beginning for me. They were so precious. (...) I always saw them as an absolutely male group. I never saw them as being remotely fey or effeminate. They were characters you simply did not brush aside, like the mafia of rock and roll."
  • The lines "driving in your car" and "how can you be drivin' down by my home, when you know I ain't got one" in the New York Dolls' song "Lonely Planet Boy" surely inspired similar ones in the Smiths' "There Is A Light That Never Goes Out".
  • In an interview given to Rolling Stone magazine in 1986, Morrissey said "For me, they were the official end of the Sixties. They were the first sign that there was change, that someone was going to kick through and get rid of all the nonsense. It gave people hope."
  • "What Kind Of Mean Reads Denim Delinquent", an etching found between the run out grooves of a limited etched edition of Morrissey's single "Interesting Drug" was a New Yorks Dolls photo caption found on the back of a fanzine from the 1970s.
  • Morrissey is seen with a framed photo of the New York Dolls in a photo session published in the NME in 1989.
  • In an interview published in The Face magazine in March 1990, Morrissey said that his song "November Spawned A Monster" "...is my version of the New York Dolls' 'Frankenstein'."
  • They were mentioned by Morrissey as being among his favourite musicians in the 1991 Kill Uncle tourbook.
  • Their song "Trash" was covered by Morrissey on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.
  • The New York Dolls original was also played during intermission before some of the latter tour's gigs.
  • The intro of the 1991 song "My Love Life" is very similar to the one from the New York Dolls' "Subway Train".
  • In an interview published in the 1991 issue of Musician, Morrissey said "But the center of it all, of course, were the New York Dolls, who completely destroyed and changed my life. Because, naturally, if you liked the New York Dolls in England in 1973, and you were 13 pushing 14, you were bound to be faced with national unpopularity. England absolutely hated the New York Dolls, they though they were the most absurd rock creation ever. They considered them to be clamorous transsexuals, which of course was not acceptable, and which of course they weren't, anyway."
  • In an interview given to Mark Kemp and published in the July 1991 issue of Select, Morrissey said "The New York Dolls were my private 'Heartbreak Hotel,' in the sense that they were as important to me as Elvis Presley was important to the entire language of rock 'n' roll. They were my only friends. I firmly believed that. I knew those people intimately. I knew everything about their lives. Of course, I really didn't, but in my own sheltered way I certainly thought I did. To me, the New York Dolls were the best group ever to come out of America, and they were loathed by America at that time. Sadly, they were reasonably appreciated only after it was too late. The New York Dolls were an early version of the Sex Pistols, and if Americans and the American music industry had only been alert enough in 1972 and 1973, the New York Dolls could have changed so much. But, not to be."
  • Their song "Jet Boy" was played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • It was also played during intermission on the 1995 Boxers tour.
  • Interviewed on Later With Jools Holland in November 1995, Morrissey said: "They were very violent, intelligent and witty... and most pop stars are not." He was then given the opportunity to choose a video to be played on the show, so he picked one by the New York Dolls.
  • In concert on 14 September 2002 Morrissey told the audience before going into the encore: "all I ask in life is that God blesses you, that Nico blesses you, that Radclyffe Hall blesses you, that Johnny Thunders blesses you, that Oscar Wilde blesses you..."
  • Their song "Trash" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks released in 2003 under the title "Under The Influence". In that album's liner notes Morrissey said "How empty life would have been without The New York Dolls". He also described how he fell in love with them and said that they were the "world's most perfect pop group".
  • Of the New York Dolls documentary "All Dolled Up", Morrissey said "An astonishing film, every frame a memory, every song a hit of the heart. America's most perfect pop group - yes, pop group."
  • Singer David Johansen supported Morrissey on a bunch of New York dates on the You Are The Quarry tour in 2004.
  • The live performances of "Everyday Is Like Sunday" on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour were preceded by the first 10 lines from the New York Dolls' "Subway Train". At the tail end of the tour this intro was instead tagged at the beginning of live performances of "Munich Air Disaster 1958".
  • The merchandise on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour included a black t-shirt featuring Morrissey's name in a New York Dolls' style lipstick font (view here).
  • One New York Dolls song might have been featured in the intermission music played before gigs on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour.
  • Their song "Vietnamese Baby" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks titled "Songs To Save Your Life" given away with the 19 June 2004 issue of the NME.
  • Morrissey managed to get the New York Dolls to reform for the 2004 Meltdown festival which he curated. The event was successful enough that the band then went on to play other concerts. At the time of the original Meltdown appearance Morrissey had this to say to Time Out magazine: "I've magnified the importance of The New York Dolls since I was a small, fat, dull child, and it isn't possible to say too much about them. The songs were great and still are, and David Johansen looks and sounds better than ever. Yes, we all wish Johnny Thunders and Jerry Nolan were still around, but they're not. I think they'd be happy to know how The Dolls are still loved."
  • In a Q&A published in Mojo in 2004, when asked "What is your all-time favourite album?", Morrissey answered "The New York Dolls debut album. I think it still has no competition as the most perfect piece of pop presentation."
  • Morrissey appeared in "New York Doll", a 2004 documentary about bassist Arthur Kane.
  • When questioned about lasting musical influences in a Q&A published on the True-To-You website in November 2005 Morrissey answered: "The royal three remain the same: The New York Dolls, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, with Nico standing firm as first reserve."
  • In a 2006 interview given to Mojo, Morrissey said "David Johansen was so clever for a 19 year old; so witty, literate, unstoppable and here, finally, it is, on film. It was always frustrating to me, that the rest of the world wouldn't take the things that were setting me alight. So it's fascinating that in 2006 it all seems to make sense."
  • Morrissey, on stage in Greenock on 29 April 2006, after performing his cover of the New York Dolls' "Human Being": "I realise over the years I've New York Dolled people to death... but I can't actually help it... I can't help it!"
  • Their songs "Bad Detective" and "Pills" were played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • Morrissey recorded and released as a b-side his own version of the New York Dolls' "Human Being" in 2006.
  • Their song "Showdown" was played before concerts at the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • A video of them performing "Looking For A Kiss" on Musik Laden and an interview of member David Johansen were shown between opening act and Morrissey on dates from the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI and on the 2007-2008 Greatest Hits Tour and on the 2009 Tour Of Refusal. The musical performances was also shown on the Swords Tour later the same year, but not the interview.
  • Morrissey, in a Q&A session published on the True-To-You website in June 2007, on having the New York Dolls at the 2004 Meltdown festival which he curated: "I often find it hard to believe that it all happened because I obviously see that isolated 14-year-old in Manchester in 1973 having no one to talk to about this LP called "The New York Dolls". I did a montage of Dolls photos for art class and the teacher was so appalled that she burst into tears and passed it around to each boy in the class denouncing the sickness and depravity of the Dolls. This teacher appeared years later on one of those bitchy Smiths television documentaries, still apparently upset. So, with all of these things in mind, it's miraculous to jump ahead 30 years and to assess the chain of events that led to Meltdown. The film, I think, greatly helped the Dolls' status because everyone who has seen the film loves it even if they hadn't much cared for the Dolls. I'm no good in the film because I felt too emotional and I could barely speak. But, me aside, it's so well done, and must be the best ever rock docu-film. As for Meltdown, that moment when David, Sylvain and Arthur trooped on - I was standing up in the balcony, frozen, unable to hold back the tears. David Johansen later asked me to sing on the new Dolls album, but I had to refuse - I'm not from New York and I'm not a Doll and I know my place...if nothing else."

  • Their song "Frankenstein" was played during intermission early on the Greatest Hits tour.
  • They were picked by Morrissey as guests when he headlined the 2008 O2 Wireless Festival in London.
  • They opened for Morrissey for most of the summer festivals he played at in the summer of 2008.
  • When invited to play his favourite bands on KCRW's Guest DJ Project in August 2008, Morrissey chose their song "There's Gonna Be A Showdown".
  • In their 2009 "My Inspiration" promotional campaign, the HMV record shop chain had a poster showing Morrissey and his chosen quote, lifted from the New York Dolls' "Frankenstein".
  • Something of theirs may have been played during intermission on a portion of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.
  • Their song "(There's Gonna Be A) Showdown" was chosen by Morrissey as one of his Desert Island Discs on his appearance on the BBC Radio4 show of that name in November 2009.
  • On the occasion of Friday the 13th August 2010, Morrissey sent to thequietus.com a list of his top 13 albums, which included the New York Dolls' self-titled debut at #1.
  • On the occasion of re-release of "EVeryday Is Like Sunday", Morrissey's Facebook page created a Spotify playlist of Morrissey 'Supreme 13 Singles' which included the New York Dolls' "Jet Boy".
  • In a 2012 email interview with Juice Online, Morrissey said "I loved everything about them – their name, their appearance, the songs, the photo sessions, their irresponsibility and their total lack of regard for the music establishment. No one had ever been this way before. They were also very funny, and very tough. ‘Jet Boy’, ‘Trash’, ‘There’s Gonna be A Showdown’ and ‘Looking For A Kiss’ ought to have been huge hit singles."
  • Unsurprisingly, Morrissey's love of the New York Dolls is covered extensively in his autobiography. He also talks about reuniting them and his personal relationship with some of its members.
  • A video of the New York Dolls was shown before Morrissey concerts on his 2014 tour.

Nico

  • In a private letter to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet), Morrissey praised her song "The End". He also send his penpal a photocopy of her Desertshore album and praised the song "All That Is My Own".
  • Her "Chelsea Girl", "Desertshore" and "The End" albums were mentioned by Morrissey as his favourites LPs in 1985's Meat Is Murder tour programme.
  • In an interview published in Select magazine in May 1994 Morrissey said of Nico's "Innocent And Vain": "This is my youth in one piece of music. Don't talk while it's on".
  • Biographer Len Brown speculates that Morrissey's "Now My Heart Is Full" might be a response to Nico's "My Heart Is Empty".
  • "Le Petit Chevalier" and "Afraid" from her "Desertshore" album were played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • Her song "Innocent And Vain" was played during intermission on the 1995 Boxers tour, the 1997 Maladjusted tour, the 1999 Oye Esteban tour and the 2002 tour.
  • The latter number was also played over the credits at the end of the original television broadcast of a show from the Boxers tour. However it was replaced by another song on "Introducing Morrissey", the video release of that broadcast.
  • In a press release for his "Maladjusted" album Morrissey (under the alias Stoney Hando) mentioned Nico's album "Chelsea Girl" as one of his favourites.
  • Her song "Frozen Warnings" could be also heard in the intermission music played before gigs on the 1999 portion of Oye Esteban tour.
  • Her song "You Forgot The Answer" was played during intermission on the 2000 portion of Oye Esteban tour.
  • In concert on 14 September 2002 Morrissey told the audience before going into the encore: "all I ask in life is that God blesses you, that Nico blesses you, that Radclyffe Hall blesses you, that Johnny Thunders blesses you, that Oscar Wilde blesses you..."
  • Her song "All That Is My Own" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks released in 2003 under the title "Under The Influence". In that album's liner notes Morrissey wrote: "On the flipside of happy, the Nico net caught me early. Her voice equalled the sound of a body being thrown out of a window - entirely with out hope, of this world, or the next, or the previous. Onstage, she moved like a big bleak creaking house, never once altering the direction of her eyes. I am in love. Her harmonium heaves and swells like crashing waves answering each other. If Nico could've laughed, she would've. But she couldn't, so she didn't."
  • When questioned about lasting musical influences in a Q&A published on the True-To-You website in November 2005 Morrissey answered: "The royal three remain the same: The New York Dolls, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, with Nico standing firm as first reserve."
  • Her song "Somewhere There's A Feather" was played before concerts at the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • Her songs "Frozen Warnings" and "All That Is My Own" were included in the intermission music at different times on the 2007 Greatest Hits tour.
  • Her song "I'm Not Saying" was chosen by Morrissey as one of his Desert Island Discs on his appearance on the BBC Radio4 show of that name in November 2009.
  • A video of the latter song was shown before concerts on the 2009 Swords Tour.
  • On the occasion of Friday the 13th August 2010, Morrissey sent to thequietus.com a list of his top 13 albums, which included Nico's "Chelsea Girl" at #4.
  • Morrissey had all his musicians dressed in Nico t-shirts when he performed on Conan O'Brien's late night programme in November 2011.
  • Morrissey mentions in his autobiography his love of Nico's music, particularly the "Chelsea Girl" album.
  • A video of Nico was shown before Morrissey concerts on his 2014 tour.

Nitros, The

  • Morrissey is seen wearing a Nitros shirt in the video for his "Pregnant For The Last Time" single.

Noise Is The Best Revenge

  • This band led by Morrissey's nephew was chosen by the singer as one of the many to play the 2008 O2 Wireless Festival in London which he headlined. The also supported Morrissey for other dates around the same time.
  • They supported Morrissey again in Manchester in May 2009.

Nomi, Klaus

  • At the Smiths' very first gig, Klaus Nomi's "The Cold Song" was played before James Maker came on stage and introduced the Smiths in French.
  • On a radio programme called My Top Ten broadcast in October 1984 Morrissey played Nomi's "Death".
  • The latter song was also mentioned by Morrissey as one of his favourite singles in 1985's Meat Is Murder tour programme. It was often mentioned in interviews here and there at the time.
  • On the Queen Is Dead tour in 1986 the Smiths' intermission music played before gigs included his song "Wayward Sisters", and sometimes also "Death".
  • For his first solo concert, a one-off thing in Wolverhampton in December 1988, Morrissey walked on stage following Nomi's "Der Nussbaum". This can be heard on Morrissey's "Hulmerist" compilation of promotional films because it features footage from the latter concert between videos.
  • Nomi was mentioned in a list of Morrissey's favourite singers titled "Bigmouths - The Singer Not The Song" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.
  • On the 1991 Kill Uncle tour and the 1992 Your Arsenal tour Morrissey walked on stage following his song "Wayward Sisters".
  • "Death" and "Der Nusbaum" were played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • His song "Der Nussbaum" was played during intermission on the 1999-2000 Oye Esteban tour.
  • His song "Death" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks released in 2003 under the title "Under The Influence". In that album's liner notes Morrissey wrote: "Klaus Nomi's dismal dignity placed him beyond the reach of crassly commercial success. His was a life quite apart from knife-plunging press reviews (as if any pop writer could ever possibly know). Nomi sang like a man trapped in the body of a dead girl. 'Death' is his dying speach, after which he was - quite literlly - led away to die, and early bull's eye for the AIDS machine-gun. The words have a dreadful ring because they came true, and so soon: 'remember me remember me but ah, forget my fate'."
  • In a Q&A published in Mojo in 2004, when asked "And your Sunday morning record?", Morrissey answered "'Death' by Klaus Nomi, or 'Lazy Sunday' by The Small Faces."
  • His songs "Der Nesbaum" and "After The Fall" were played during intermission at various points into the 2007 Greatest Hits tour.
  • Morrissey walked on stage at the end of "Wayward Sisters" on the UK/France leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • His song "Der Nusbaum" was chosen by Morrissey as one of his Desert Island Discs on his appearance on the BBC Radio4 show of that name in November 2009.
  • He came in at #4 in a top 15 list of "most revered singers" put up on the True To You website on 1 January 2014.

Ochs, Phil

  • He was mentioned in a Morrissey letter to the NME circa 1977.
  • His song "City Boy" was played during intermission on the 1995 Boxers tour.

O'Hara, Mary Margaret

  • She is the screaming voice heard in the bridge of Morrissey's "November Spawned A Monster". She also does back vocals on b-side "He Knows I'd Love To See Him".
  • In a list titled 'Hopes' published in the NME in 1989, Morrissey included "daydream off to Llandudno with Mary Margaret O'Hara."

  • In an interview published in The Face in March 1990 Morrissey said: "I was massively intrigued by her album. I thought it so beautiful I suddenly realised I hadn't in a decade heard someone singing because of deep-set personal neurosis, absolute need and desperation. You'd think she might fall apart at any second and become a pile of rags and bones on stage. For the first time in almost a decade I was 'high' - mentally really, really high. What kept coming back to me was 'Horses'."

Orange Juice

  • In an interview published in GQ magazine in 2005, when asked about his favourite Orange Juice song, Morrissey answered "Felicity".

Ordinary Boys, The

  • They were invited to perform at the 2004 Meltdown Festival which Morrissey curated.
  • Their song "(Little) Bubble" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks titled "Songs To Save Your Life" given away with the 19 June 2004 issue of the NME. However, according to his "Autobiography", the decision to include this track may have been that of the NME who wanted more modern music on the compilation, as he had selected material that "date[d] back to the Roaring Twenties."

Orlando, Tony

  • In his autobiography Morrissey wrote that as a child, "Tony Orlando's surfs-up voice leaps on Bless You, and I am spirited away watching and watching as these discs spin, calling up to me."

O'Sullivan, Gilbert

  • Morrissey covered his 1970 song "Nothing Rhymed" twice in 2002.
  • He has an album titled "Southpaw", which may have something to do with Morrissey naming his 1995 album "Southpaw Grammar".
  • Lines from his song "Alone Again (Naturally)" could have inspired Morrissey when he wrote "I Have Forgiven Jesus".

Panics, The

Paper Dolls

  • Their song "Something Here In My Heart (Keeps Tellin' Me No)" was played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • Interviewed for the 1997 Brit Girls documentary, Morrissey said "The Paper Dolls were very interesting. They made great records, only one of which was a hit, called 'Something Here In My Heart (Keeps A-Tellin' Me No)'. They were from Manchester, they were on the Pye label and they were great for, god bless them, a year. Then it was back to Woolworths. A great year... for Woolworths."

(Parry, Hubert / William Blake)

  • A version of "Jerusalem" sung by the Borstal inmates in the film "The Loneliness Of The Long Distance Runner" was played during intermission on the 1995 Boxers and Outside tours.
  • This can also be heard on the "Introducing Morrissey" live video featuring footage from the Sheffield and Blackpool concerts of that tour.

Part, Arvo

  • A performance of his "Tabula Rasa" closed the 2004 Meltdown Festival which Morrissey curated.

Pavone, Rita

  • Her song "Heart" was mentioned with nine other records in a list titled "Portrait Of The Artist As A Consumer", Morrissey's top ten films, symbolists, records and books published in the 17 September 1983 issue of the NME.
  • That song was also included by Morrissey on a radio programme called My Top Ten broadcast in October 1984.
  • The song was also mentioned as his favourite in a Q&A published in the 31 January 1985 issue of Smash Hits.
  • In "Yeahs And Yeuks", a list of loved and hated songs published in No.1 magazine in 1985, her song "Heart" was listed at #3 in the "yeahs" section.
  • The song was again mentioned in a list of Morrissey favourites titled "Singles To Be Cremated With" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.
  • Rita Pavone was mentioned by Morrissey as one of his favourite singers in an interview published in Raygun in March 1994.
  • Interviewed for the 1997 Brit Girls documentary, Morrissey said "She made the best record in the history of... abattoirs. It was called 'Heart', it was on RCA and I think it got to number 12 or 26. Incredible, absolutely incredible, almost as good as... Tommy Steele."
  • In an interview publised in XL magazine in 2006 Morrissey said "When I was six I bought 'Heart' (Cuore) by Rita Pavone. I still own it. And then...Gigliola Cinquetti, do you know the song 'Yes'? It represented Italy at the eurofestival."
  • A video of her song "Cuore" was shown before concerts on the 2009 Swords Tour.
  • "Heart" was also mentioned as an early favourite in Morrissey's autobiography.
  • Morrissey (source unknown): "I am very interested in Sandie Shaw and singers who are similar to her like Timi Yuro and Rita Pavone. They both suffered a hasty eclipse. It was because of them I wrote my book 'The History of the Female Voice in Popular Music'. Two publishers are interested in it."

Phantom Planet

  • They supported Morrissey in Los Angeles and Irvine on the latter half of the Oye Esteban tour.

Phranc

Pioneers, The

  • Their song "Let Your Yeah Be Yeah" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.

Pitney, Gene

  • The line "I could never never go back home again" in his song "24 Hours From Tulsa" might have been reused in the Smiths' "Is It Really So Strange?".

Planet Rockers, The

Pony Club

  • They supported Morrissey in London on 18 September 2002 and in Dublin on 2 October 2002.
  • Their song "The Thing About Men" was played during intermission on the 2002 tour.
  • Their song "Single" was played during intermission on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour and before concerts at the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • The latter song was also included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks titled "Songs To Save Your Life" given away with the 19 June 2004 issue of the NME. However, according to his "Autobiography", the decision to include this track may have been that of the NME who wanted more modern music on the compilation, as he had selected material that "date[d] back to the Roaring Twenties."

Porter, Cole

  • The line "In my own strange way, I've always been true to you / In my own sick way, I'll always stay true to you" from Morrissey's "Speedway" may very well have been inspired by one from Cole Porter's showtune "Always True To You In My Fashion".

Posey, Sandy

  • On a radio programme called My Top Ten broadcast in October 1984 Morrissey played "I Take It Back".
  • That song was also mentioned in a list of Morrissey favourites titled "Singles To Be Cremated With" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.

Prefab Sprout

  • In an interview published in Spin in April 1991, Morrissey said of Prefab Sprout leader Paddy McAloon: "I'm actually a fan of his; I criticized him recently and slightly regretted it, even though I believed what I said. I thought the first record that he made was reasonably priceless."

Presley, Elvis

  • Morrissey (interview source unknown): "All but the last five years".
  • Live performances of the Smiths' "Rusholme Ruffians" in 1985 and 1986 concerts featured the first two verses of Elvis' "(Marie's The Name) His Latest Flame" tagged at the beginning as an intro.
  • The etching found between the runout grooves of the "Ask" single was "Are you loathesome tonight?", a pun on Elvis' "Are You Lonesome Tonight".
  • A photo of Elvis taken in 1955 by his hairdresser was used for the cover of the Smiths' "Shoplifters Of The World Unite" single.
  • It is speculated that Presley's song "Is It So Strange?" might have inspired the Smiths' "Is It Really So Strange?" It features the words "Is it so strange to be in love with you?". This link to Elvis is even more likely considering how Elvis' influence on Morrissey and also on Marr was at its peak at the time this song was written.
  • The Smiths have recorded a version of Presley's "A Fool Such As I" during the sessions for the "Girlfriend In A Coma" single, but this was never released.
  • Elvis was mentioned in a list of Morrissey's favourite singers titled "Bigmouths - The Singer Not The Song" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.
  • He is seen on the prison walls in the video for the Morrissey single "The Last Of The Famous International Playboys".
  • His song "I Need Your Love Tonight" was played during intermission on an American leg of the 1991 Kill Uncle tour (and perhaps more).
  • Morrissey's song "Tomorrow" shares the line "tell me that you love me" with the song "Tomorrow Never Comes", which was popularized by Elvis and Glen Campbell, amongst others.
  • A photo of a smiling Elvis was used as a backdrop here and there on the Your Arsenal tour (view).
  • A 1968 film called "Speedway" starred Presley and Nancy Sinatra. This could just be a coincidence, it might not have anything to do with Morrissey's song of the same name, although Morrissey did mention in 1986 that it was his favourite Elvis film.
  • Morrissey is seen doing a puzzle of Elvis on the photo used as the cover of the "Oye Esteban" DVD compilation.
  • Elvis' song "Tiger Man" was played during intermission on the 2000 Oye Esteban tour.
  • The stage backdrop on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour was nine very tall letters spelling out Morrissey's name, disposed in an arc at the back. The letters had light bulbs on them. The visual result was very impressive and reminiscent of Elvis' Comeback Special (view).
  • When questioned about lasting musical influences in a Q&A published on the True-To-You website in November 2005 Morrissey answered: "The royal three remain the same: The New York Dolls, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, with Nico standing firm as first reserve."
  • In a Q&A published on the True-To-You website in February 2006 Morrissey answered the question "Who do you admire vocally?" with: "I think Elvis Presley had a great voice, and Frank Sinatra - two obvious choices, perhaps. Neither ever sounded unsure."
  • Coming on stage at the V Festival on 20 August 2006 Morrissey picked up the microphone and sang the first line of Elvis Presley's "Are You Lonesome Tonight". However attentive ears noticed that the man actually sang "Are you loathsome to light..."
  • Something of his was played during intermission on the summer festivals leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • He came in at #9 in a top 15 list of "most revered singers" put up on the True To You website on 1 January 2014.

Pretenders

  • Lead singer Chrissie Hynde is a friend of Morrissey's. She appeared in Morrissey's video for "Sing Your Life" and sang back-up vocals on the songs "My Love Life" and "Shame Is The Name".
  • The Pretenders version of Morrissey's "Everyday Is Like Sunday" was played before the March 1994 instore signing sessions for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • The latter cover was also played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • He requested that their song "One Thing Never Changed" be played when he was interviewed by Janice Long in October 2008.
  • "Love's A Mystery" was played during intermission on a portion of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.
  • Morrissey's friendship with Chrissie Hynde is mentioned in Morrissey's "Autobiography". He also praises her person and her involvement in animal protection.

Primitives

  • Morrissey was a big fan of their music around 1986. He wore their "Stop Killing Me" t-shirt on stage at the band's final concert on 12 December 1986.

Procol Harum

Prokofiev

  • On live dates from the autumn of 1984 to the end of their career the Smiths entered stage after the very dramatic "March Of The Capulets" (aka "Dance Of The Knights") overture from Romeo And Juliet. The recording used by the Smiths was a 1982 one by the Philadelphia Orchestra, conducted by Riccardo Muti.

Promise Ring, The

Pullen, Dwight

  • His song "Sunglasses After Dark" was featured in the intermission music on the third American leg of the Greatest Hits tour.

Queens Of The Stone Age

  • Although he never expressed a clear appreciation for this band at any point in his career, Morrissey was seen attending one of their concerts in May 2013.

Radcliffe, Jimmy

  • His song "(There Goes The) Forgotten Man" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks released in 2003 under the title "Under The Influence". In that album's liner notes Morrissey wrote: "(...) the imagination chatters convulsively through Nat Couty's 'Woodpecker Rock', Charlie Feathers' 'one Hand Loose', Jimmy Radcliffe's 'The Forgotten Man', and Jay Bee Wasden's 'De Castro'. Of these last four, I would not pretend to know any background details, but the happiness these songs give me seems, now, to be everlasting - even if this is music played with a lop-sided grim, then please hook me."

Railway Children, The

  • They supported the Smiths on 24 October 1986 at London's Brixton Academy.

Rakes, The

  • In a Q&A published in Uncut magazine in 2006, Morrissey answered the question "The Rakes or The Kooks?" with "The Rakes".

Ramones

  • Although Morrissey had letters published in British music magazines in July and September 1976 in which he spoke negatively of the Ramones, he wrote positively about them in a letter printed in the 11 December 1976 issue of Melody Maker. They soon became one of his favourite bands.
  • "Blitzkrieg Pop" was allegedly almost covered by The Smiths with James in 1985.
  • Their song "Beat On The Brat" was played during intermission on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.
  • "Judy Is A Punk", "Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue", "I Don't Wanna Go Down To The Basement", "Loudmouth" and "Today Your Love, Tomorrow The World" from their debut album were played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • Their song "Judy Is A Punk" was played during intermission on the 1995 Boxers tour.
  • "Beat On The Brat" was also reported as having been played before gigs on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • "Judy Is A Punk" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks released in 2003 under the title "Under The Influence". In that album's liner notes Morrissey wrote: "In the real world of pop songs, genius drags the always reluctant world along. Awful to listen to on first play, the first Ramones album stays beside me almost 30 years on. A cruel £5.29 on import in 1976, this is an album of criminal ballads, and 'Judy is a Punk' still sends a shock through the blood, complete with red-herring lyrical lift from 'I'm Henry the Eighth I Am' ('second verse/it's the same as the first'). At Manchester's electric Circus to promote their debut album, the Ramones move across the stage like human remails floating ashore. Smallpox brought them together. Joes is whooping cough on two impossibly long legs. Someone who has been murdered in a hospital bed looks better than Joey. The Ramones do nothing to conceal their disibilities, and once again I am in love."
  • Their songs "Carbona Not Glue" and "Why Is It Always This Way?" were played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • In early 2007 Morrissey announced that he wished to be buried near Johnny Ramone at the Hollywood Forever cemetary. Morrissey: "I like that cemetery. I stumbled across Johnny Ramone's stone and thought it was very nicely placed. (...) I sat there for a long time and I felt quite good about it. It was nice his bones were under the soil I was sitting on. So yeah, that's my spot."
  • Their song "Cretin Hop" was played during intermission on the third American leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • Something of theirs was played during intermission on the UK/France leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • Two photos of Morrissey at Johnny Ramone's grave appeared alongside an interview of him published in an early 2009 issue of Filter magazine. Other shots from that session were used for the artwork of the "Something Is Squeezing My Skull" single released later the same year.
  • Their song "Loudmouth" was chosen by Morrissey as one of his Desert Island Discs on his appearance on the BBC Radio4 show of that name in November 2009.
  • On the occasion of Friday the 13th August 2010, Morrissey sent to thequietus.com a list of his top 13 albums, which included the Ramones' self-titled debut at #2.
  • In a 2012 email interview with Billboard magazine, Morrissey addressed the contradiction between his early negative opinion of the band (see above) and his current love for them: "When I bought the Ramones first album on import, I was enraged with jealousy because I felt they had booted the Dolls off the map. I was 100% wrong. Three days after writing that Ramones piece, I realized that my love for the Ramones would out-live time itself. And it shall. Well, it virtually has already. If the Ramones were alive today, they'd be the biggest band in the world. It takes the world 30 years to catch on, doesn't it?"
  • Morrissey talks about the discovery of the Ramones and his initial lukewarm appreciation of them in his autobiography.
  • A video of the Ramones was shown before Morrissey concerts on his 2014 tour.

(Raudive, Konstantin)

  • The "you are sleeping, you do not want to believe" sample at the end of the Smiths' "Rubber Ring" was taken from his 1971 LP "Breakthrough: An Amazing Experiment In Electronic Communication With The Dead". Raudive claimed that he recorded the voices of the dead in laboratory conditions. The voice however is not his, but that of Nadia Fowler, the English translator.

Ray, Diane

  • It is speculated that her song "Please Don't Talk To The Lifeguard" might have inspired Morrissey's "Lifeguard Sleeping, Girl Drowning", or his unreleased song "Lifeguard On Duty".

Ray, Johnnie

  • Johnny Ray had a big hit titled "You Don't Owe Me A Thing" which could have inspired the Smiths' "You Don't Owe Me Anything".
  • It is speculated that Morrissey wore an hearing aid in the early days of the Smiths as a tribute to him.
  • He once did a duet with Timi Yuro who also is one of Morrissey's favourites singers.
  • In an interview published in Rorschach Magazine in late 1983/early 1984 Morrissey mentioned that he was quite fond of crooners such as Johnny Ray, Frank Sinatra and Dennis Lotis.
  • His back-up band were called The Four Lads, while Morrissey called his own band Th'Lads around 1991-1992.
  • It is speculated that his biggest hit, titled "Cry", may have influenced Morrissey's "He Cried" because Ray actually wept on stage when he performed the song.

Raymonde
   See James Maker.

Red Cortez

Red Guitars, The

Reed, Lou

  • In a private letter to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet), Morrissey wrote "As for old Uncle Lou, 'The Bells' must be his 'meisterwork'."
  • A Lou Reed press conference excerpt was shown between opening act and Morrissey on live dates from the tail end of the Tour Of Refusal and on the Swords Tour.
  • Morrissey covered his song "Satellite Of Love" on the 2011 tour.
  • In an interview to Radionica (Columbia) in early 2012, Morrissey mentioned Lou Reed in a list of artists he was indebted to.
  • When Reed died in October 2013, Morrissey wrote had the following letter posted on the True-To-You website: "Oh Lou / why did you leave us this way? No words to express the sadness at the death of Lou Reed. He had been there all of my life. He will always be pressed to my heart. Thank God for those, like Lou, who move within their own laws, otherwise imagine how dull the world would be. I knew the Lou of recent years and he was always full of good heart. His music will outlive time itself. We are all timebound, but today, with the loss of liberating Lou, life is a pigsty."
  • In his autobiography, Morrissey mentions seeing Lou Reed in concert as a teenager.

Reeves, Martha & The Vandellas

  • Their song "Third Finger, Left Hand" was mentioned in a list of Morrissey favourites titled "Singles To Be Cremated With" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.
  • The song was played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".

Remma

Reparata

  • Their song "Shoes" was mentioned in a list of Morrissey favourites titled "Singles To Be Cremated With" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.
  • In an interview published in the January 2006 issue of Uncut Johnny Marr confirmed that he and Morrissey were both fans of this song. This is probably why the intro to "A Rush And A Push And The Land Is Ours" sounds like the intro of "Shoes".
  • See related band the Delrons.

Richard, Cliff

  • He was a special guest for a Morrissey concert in New York on 21 June 2014

Righteous Brothers

  • With its chorus of "just once in my life let me get what I want", their song "Just Once In My Life" may have inspired Morrissey when he wrote "Please, Please, Please, Let Me Get What I Want".
  • Morrissey, in an interview to Mojo magazine in 2006: "When I was a child I was obsessed with 'You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling', the way the two voices were jumping around, and, when I saw it on Top Of The Pops, the way [they] would not look at each other and sing those two parts was extraordinary."
  • In a 2006 interview to Uncut magazine, Morrissey said he "...wanted to be Bobby out of the Righteous Brothers" after seeing them on television.
  • Morrissey talks about his early obsession with the song "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling" in his "Autobiography".
  • Singer Bobby Hatfield was at #2 in a top 15 list of "most revered singers" put up on the True To You website on 1 January 2014.
  • In a Q&A published on the True To You website in January 2014, he said that singer Bobby Hatfield was the one who inspired him to sing: "his falsetto swoop made me jump backwards over the settee." He also said that he wanted to cover "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling" with David Bowie but the latter singer declined.

Roe, Tommy

  • His song "Sheila" was played during intermission on an American leg of the 1991 Kill Uncle tour (and perhaps more).

Rolling Stones

  • Although he never expressed a clear appreciation for this band at any point in his career, Morrissey was seen attending one of their concerts in May 2013.
  • In his "Autobiography", Morrissey admits not understanding the appreciation Johnny Marr had for the Rolling Stones during the Smiths days, but that he had since had a change of heart.

Ronson, Mick

  • Ronson was hired by Morrissey to produce his "Your Arsenal" album. This had probably more to do with Ronson's work with David Bowie or Lou Reed than his solo work.
  • In a questionnaire published in the January 1995 issue of Q magazine, Morrissey answered the question "When did you last cry and why?" with "Death of Michael R."
  • It is rumoured that Morrissey may have written songs for Mick Ronson.
  • The February 2013 edition of Uncut magazine features an article on Mick Ronson including "Morrissey On Mick", an interview with Morrissey praising the guitarist who produced his "Your Arsenal" album. Read from scan here.
  • Morrissey discusses admiring and working with Ronson in his "Autobiography".

Roxy Music

  • Their song "Street Life" was requested by Morrissey in an interview to KROQ in July 1997. He then said about the band: "Excellent unique sound, a very, very unique group in their early years. They certainly slipped under water a bit when they became famous, but this is very unique sound."
  • "Street Life" was covered by Morrissey in Karlstad (Sweden) and Oslo (Norway) on his Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI. The cover was not particularly well received and Morrissey decided to drop the song from his set after these two performances.
  • On the occasion of Friday the 13th August 2010, Morrissey sent to thequietus.com a list of his top 13 albums, which included Roxy Music's "For Your Pleasure" at #9. The album was later edited out of this list after Morrissey found out Ferry was a fan of hunting.
  • On the occasion of re-release of "EVeryday Is Like Sunday", Morrissey's Facebook page created a Spotify playlist of Morrissey 'Supreme 13 Singles' which included Roxy Music's "Do The Strand".
  • In his autobiography, Morrissey talks about his love for early Roxy Music.
  • See also Roxy Music member Andy Mackay.

Sack

  • They supported Morrissey on the 1999 half of the Oye Esteban tour and on a good portion of the 2002 tour.
  • Their song "Colorado Springs" was played during intermission on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour.
  • It was also included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks titled "Songs To Save Your Life" given away with the 19 June 2004 issue of the NME.
  • In an interview published in GQ magazine in 2005, when asked about the Sack album "Born To Quit", Morrissey replied "It's my ninth favourite album... but you'll never find a copy."
  • Morrissey mentions his friendship with singer Martin McCann in his "Autobiography".

Safka, Melanie

  • Morrissey mentions in "Autobiography" how as a teenager he discovered and was impressed by this folk singer's lyrics.
  • She came in at #14 in a top 15 list of "most revered singers" put up on the True To You website on 1 January 2014, despite never having been mentioned as a favourite before.
  • Morrissey said "lately I keep listening to I really loved Harold and also Johnny boy by Melanie Safka" in a Q&A published on the True-To-You website in January 2014.

Sainte-Marie, Buffy

  • Morrissey allegedly collects her music, along with contemporaries from the 1970s West coast folk scene such as Joni Mitchell.
  • She has a song called "Suffer Little Children" and this could have inspired the title of the Smiths song.
  • The line "and everything depends upon how near you stand to me" in the Smiths' "Hand In Glove" was very likely inspired the line "and everything depends upon how near you sleep to me" from her song "Bells" (written by Leonard Cohen).
  • She was mentioned in a list of Morrissey's favourite singers titled "Bigmouths - The Singer Not The Song" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.
  • In an interview published in Q magazine in December 1989 Morrissey said "I can also appreciate people like Buffy Saint-Marie. (...) Even today I get very excited by Buffy Saint-Marie. I thought she had a great voice and great passion. (...) A very underrated artist; there's millions of them."
  • Her song "Until It's Time For You To Go" could supposedly be heard in the intermission music played before gigs on the 1992 Your Arsenal tour.
  • The title of her songs "You're Gonna Need Somebody On Your Bond" and "Better To Find Out For Yourself" may or may not have influenced Morrissey's "You're Gonna Need Someone On Your Side" and "Why Don't You Find Out For Yourself".
  • Her song "Codeine" was played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • She was invited to perform at the 2004 Meltdown Festival which Morrissey curated, but declined.
  • Morrissey considered appearing at a Buffy Sainte-Marie tribute in 2008, but rejected because of his boycott of Canada (the tribute was held in Montreal). In a statement explaining his decision at the time Morrissey said "I first bought a Buffy Sainte-Marie record when I was 12, and her music has always remained with me. In the 1960s, as a political activist, Buffy's lyrics were fearless, and I'm very grateful for all the risks that she took."
  • In an interview given to Stuart Maconie for BBC Radio 2 in early 2009 Morrissey requested that her song "Soldier Blue" be played.
  • On the occasion of re-release of "EVeryday Is Like Sunday", Morrissey's Facebook page created a Spotify playlist of Morrissey 'Supreme 13 Singles' which included "Soldier Blue".
  • In an interview to Radionica (Columbia) in early 2012, Morrissey mentioned Buffy Sainte-Marie in a list of artists he was indebted to.
  • In "Autobiography", Morrissey talks about buying her "Soldier Blue" single and the effect it and its b-side had on him.
  • She came in at #8 in a top 15 list of "most revered singers" put up on the True To You website on 1 January 2014.

Santaolalla, Gustavo

  • This Oscar winning Argentinian composer was asked by Morrissey to produce "Children And Pieces" and "My Dearest Love", b-sides to the "All You Need Is Me" single from 2008.

Satie, Erik

  • His piano "Gymnopedies no 1", "Gnossiennes" and others from the album "After the Rain" were heard before certain concerts on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.

Searchers

  • It is speculated that the line "goodbye my love" from the end of the Smiths' "Death At One's Elbow" was inspired by their song "Goodbye My Love".

Seress, Rezsõ

  • His "Gloomy Sunday" - also known as the "Hungarian Suicide Song" in English speaking countries - which was recorded by many famous people over the years features the line "Let them not weep, let them know that I'm glad to go...", a likely inspiration for the lyrics to the Smiths' "Asleep".

Sex Pistols

  • Morrissey had a letter published in the 11 December 1975 issue of Melody Maker in which he spoke negatively of the Sex Pistols. However, after seeing them live in mid 1976, he wrote another letter (published in the NME on 18 June 1976), this one praising them and comparing them to his beloved New York Dolls. Then in September 1976 he had a letter published in Sounds in which he mentions that it is "a joke that the Dolls should be compared to such notoriously no-talents as the Ramones and the Sex Pistols". He mentioned them once more in a letter about the state of punk published on 11 November 1976 in Melody Maker.
  • Morrissey offered Chris Thomas, the producer of the Sex Pistols' "Never Mind The Bollocks, Here's The Sex Pistols", to produce his album "Southpaw Grammar", but he declined.
  • In an interview published in the 11 February 2006 issue of the NME Morrissey was quoted: "I think they changed the world and I'm very grateful for that. I saw them three times at the very beginning and they were breathtaking and very necessary and I simply feel gratitude. Everybody on the planet has shortcomings, and most people can't see it through, but it doesn't matter because most people give nothing and they gave so much and they've sustained."
  • Morrissey talks about his discovery of the Sex Pistols in his autobiography.

Shangri-La's

  • Their song "Give Him A Great Big Kiss" (one of Morrissey's beloved New York Dolls favourites) was rehearsed by the Nosebleeds during the short period in 1978 when Morrissey was part of the (remains of that) band. The decision to tackle this cover was of course Morrissey's. He didn't alter the gender of the title when he sang it, just like he wouldn't when covering the Cookie's "I Want A Boy For My Birthday" at the very beginning of the Smiths.
  • The title of their song "He Cried" might have inspired Morrissey for his own.
  • Their song "Never Again" was played before concerts during portions of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.

Shapiro, Helen

  • Interviewed for the 1997 Brit Girl documentary, Morrissey said "'Tell Me What He Said' was a great record. 'Don't Treat Me Like A Child', that's quite revolutionary. No, it's not my theme tune, not really at the age of 37, but that's what all teenagers were saying at that time, at the end of the Fifties. Nineteen Sixty One - 'Don't Treat Me Like A Child'!".

Shaw, Sandie

  • In a private letter to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet), Morrissey mentioned that he was listening to Sandie Shaw amongst others at that time.
  • The line "If you wore rags, you'd still look good to me" in her song "You've Not Changed" very likely influenced Morrissey when he wrote the words to "Hand In Glove".
  • She was mentioned alongside nine other 'symbolists' in a list titled "Portrait Of The Artist As A Consumer", a list of Morrissey's favourite films, symbolists, records and books published in the 17 September 1983 issue of the NME. Her song "Stop Before You Start" was also mentioned in the 'records' category.
  • An article on Sandie Shaw written by Morrissey was published in the 24 December 1983 issue of Sounds Magazine.
  • After much insistence from Morrissey and Johnny Marr (Morrissey wrote to her stating "The Sandie Shaw legend cannot be over yet - there is more to be done"), Sandie accepted to collaborate with the Smiths on a single which featured her own versions of the band's "Hand In Glove", "I Don't Owe You Anything" and "Jeane". This led to her getting on stage two nights in a row around the time of release of that single to do "I Don't Owe You Anything" with the band.
  • Morrissey and Marr praised her song "Keep In Touch" in letters to her when they were asking her to collaborate with them. Ironically that song was the b-side to her single "I Don't Need Anything" and she would end up recording the similarly titled "I Don't Owe You Anything" with the Smiths.
  • In an early 1984 interview (source unknown), when asked on the subject of their collaboration, Morrissey said "I met her a few months ago and it seemed perfectly natural for me to seize the opportunity and ask her to work with us and she was incredibly eager and incredibly enthusiastic. She really liked the songs and she was very eager to do it. So, it's happened and I'm very pleased."
  • The title of the Smiths' "Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now" was inspired by that of Sandie's "Heaven Knows I'm Missing Him Now". The song was written and recorded at the same time the band was working with Sandie on the single they would release together. On the subject of the inspiration for the title Morrissey told Len Brown in a 1997 interview for the Brit Girls documentary: "It was an in-joke. But it was so 'in' that nobody really got it. It was a private joke between she and me."
  • On some dates from the summer of 1984 the Smiths entered stage after her song "Girl Don't Come".
  • On a radio programme called My Top Ten broadcast in October 1984 Morrissey played her song "You've Not Changed".
  • In an interview published in Melody Maker on 3 November 1984 Morrissey said "To me it was revolutionary. It proved to me that the gap between artists is really quite slim. The tabloids leaped on the case with great vigour. They were completely skeptical. 'Sandy how can you possibly work with these blimps, these obscure characters from criminal areas of Manchester. How can you possibly soil your slippers?' So it was horror all round. We think that society is dedicated to the class system but it's rife throughout the music industry."
  • In "Yeahs And Yeuks", a list of loved and hated songs published in No.1 magazine in 1985, her song "You've Not Changed" was listed at #1 and "Today" at #10 in the "yeahs" section.
  • It is possible that the "message received" line in the Smiths' "Unloveable" was inspired by her song "Message Understood".
  • In an interview given to journalist Len Brown for the NME in 1988, Morrissey defends that "Viva Hate" means "Long Live Hate", which prompted Brown to speculate that this might be "...Morrissey's comic response to Sandie Shaw's 1965 hit 'Long Live Love'."
  • Her songs "You've Not Changed" and "Voice In The Crowd" as well as her version of the Smiths' "Jeane" were played during intermission on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.
  • It is speculated that her 1966 hit "Tomorrow" may have something to do with Morrissey's own song with the same title.
  • In an interview given to Len Brown in 1997 for the "Brit Girls" series, Morrissey said: "Sandie, I think, was probably the best of the lot. Her discography was better, longer than the others. There was something about her voice, something very... I was going to say cheap but it was close to cheap. Just something very noisy and natural about it. I liked her because she was very of the street and off the street, very unpretentious, and she was quite raucous and though almost. All the records were (...) all slightly hard on the ears and heavily orchestrated. Very brassy. I liked that because it sounded like she'd just walked in off the street and began to sing and then just strolled home and... bought some chips. (On his favourite Sandie records) There are so many. I like one, which you won't know, called 'Keep In Touch'. And 'You've Not Changed', which was a reasonably big hit, that's probably the best one. The simplicity was very touching. Simplicity with a hint of aggression... which is always a fantastic mixture. And she had great b-sides. 'Stop Before You Start'. She was the best!"
  • Her song "You've Not Changed" was played before concerts at the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • The latter song was also mentioned as an early favourite in Morrissey's autobiography.
  • Morrissey (source unknown): "I am very interested in Sandie Shaw and singers who are similar to her like Timi Yuro and Rita Pavone. They both suffered a hasty eclipse. It was because of them I wrote my book 'The History of the Female Voice in Popular Music'. Two publishers are interested in it."
  • Morrissey (source unknown): "It's really quite strange because as I grew up all the strong female voices of the Sixties seemed to affect me enormously - certainly none more than Sandie - and it really became quite a special part of me."
  • Unsurprisingly, Morrissey discusses his collaboration with Sandie Shaw in his autobiography.

Sheila Divine, The

Shins, The

  • They supported Morrissey in New York on 7 May 2004.

Shocking Blue

  • Morrissey requested Shocking Blue's "Mighty Joe" on Russell Brand's radio programme in August 2008.
  • He requested the same song again when he was interviewed by Janice Long in October 2008.
  • A photo of Morrissey holding a Shocking Blue "Ink Pot" single appeared with an interview published in a early 2009 issue of Filter magazine.
  • A video of their song "Mighty Joe" was shown before concerts on portions of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal and on the Swords Tour later the same year.
  • On the occasion of re-release of "EVeryday Is Like Sunday", Morrissey's Facebook page created a Spotify playlist of Morrissey 'Supreme 13 Singles' which included "Mighty Joe".
  • They are mentioned as an early favourite in Morrissey's autobiography.

Shostakovitch

  • The intro to his symphony no. 5 was sampled and looped to produce the basic track of "The Teachers Are Afraid Of The Pupils".

Shrinking Violet

Sigh

Simone. Nina

  • One of her songs was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • On portions of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal, Morrissey walked on stage at the end of an instrumental piano version of her "You'll Never Walk Alone".

Simple Minds

  • Morrissey mentioned liking "Today I Died Again" in a private letter to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet).

Sinatra, Frank

  • In an interview published in Rorschach Magazine in late 1983/early 1984 Morrissey mentioned that he was quite fond of crooners such as Johnny Ray, Frank Sinatra and Dennis Lotis.
  • Morrissey covered Mancini's "Moonriver" from Breakfast At Tiffany's. According to an interview he gave to the Independent in June 1994, Sinatra's is his favorite vocal version of the song.
  • In an interview given to KCXX in 1998, Morrissey said "I thought he had patches of brilliance and I thought he gave a great deal to people. Lots of people didn't like him as a person I gather and the eulogies in England were very, very bad but I think he was one of the greatest."
  • His "Who Wants To Be A Millionaire" duet with Celeste Holm was played during intermission on the 1999 Oye Esteban tour.
  • On the 1999-2000 Oye Esteban tour his classic "My Way" was heard after Morrissey's gigs, as the fans exited the venue. This was also the case for most of the 2002 tour and all of the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour. Morrissey returned to it again on the 2009 Swords Tour.
  • When questioned about lasting musical influences in a Q&A published on the True-To-You website in November 2005 Morrissey answered: "The royal three remain the same: The New York Dolls, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, with Nico standing firm as first reserve."
  • In a Q&A published on the True-To-You website in February 2006, Morrissey answered the question "Who do you admire vocally?" with: "I think Elvis Presley had a great voice, and Frank Sinatra - two obvious choices, perhaps. Neither ever sounded unsure."
  • "That's Life" was played after Morrissey gigs, as the fans exited the venue on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI, on the 2007-2008 Greatest Hits tour and on the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.

Sinatra, Nancy

  • Her song "How Does That Grab You?" was mentioned with nine other records in a list titled "Portrait Of The Artist As A Consumer", Morrissey's top ten films, symbolists, records and books published in the 17 September 1983 issue of the NME.
  • A 1968 film called "Speedway" starred Elvis Presley and Nancy Sinatra. This could just be a coincidence and have nothing to do with Morrissey's song of the same name.
  • At Morrissey's request she appeared in the 2003 documentary "The Importance Of Being Morrissey".
  • At Morrissey's invitation she recorded a version of his song "Let Me Kiss You" which was released as a single on Morrissey's own label Attack on the very same day he released his own version as a single.
  • Her version of Morrissey's "Let Me Kiss You" was played during intermission on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour.
  • She was invited by Morrissey to perform at the 2004 Meltdown festival which he curated. In an interview published in Time Out magazine at the time Morrissey said "The songs of Nancy Sinatra are full of heart. She has a timeless style and nothing ever dates it."
  • She supported Morrissey in Los Angeles on 11 November and 12 November 2004.
  • In his "Autobiography", Morrissey praises her and talks about their friendship and working with her.
  • Nancy appears in the promotional video for the 2014 song "World Peace Is None Of Your Business".

Siouxsie And The Banshees

  • Their song "Mirage" was played during intermission on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.
  • The latter song was also supposedly included in the intermission music on the 1992 Your Arsenal tour.
  • "Playground Twist", "Mother/Oh Mein Papa" and "The Lord's Prayer" from their album "Join Hands" were played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • A cover of Timi Yuro's "Interlude" was recorded and released as a single in 1994 by Morrissey in duet with Siouxsie.
  • "Mother/Oh Mein Papa" was also played during intermission on the 1995 dates promoting "Southpaw Grammar".
  • Their song "Eve White / Eve Black" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • "Spellbound" was played at Morrissey's request during an interview to KROQ on 6 July 1997. On the subject he told them that "they were one of the great groups of the late 70s, early 80s and very underrated, I think. Siouxsie and the Banshees were excellent."
  • Solo Siouxsie was picked by Morrissey as a guest when he headlined the 2008 O2 Wireless Festival in London.
  • Something of theirs was played during intermission on the summer festivals leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • He requested that their song "Mother" be played when he was interviewed by Janice Long in October 2008.
  • Something of theirs may have been played during intermission on a portion of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.
  • In his "Autobiography", Morrissey had great words to say about Siouxsie the artist, but not so much about their professional relationship.

Slits

  • Their song "Love Und Romance" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks titled "Songs To Save Your Life" given away with the 19 June 2004 issue of the NME.
  • Singer Ari Up was invited by Morrissey to perform at the Meltdown festival which he curated in 2004. In an interview published in Time Out at the time, he said: "Ari Up has, I think, remained her true self. The Slits were about the shock of selfrecognition. As a meagre fan, I would've loved four, five or six albums instead of just the one."
  • In a Q&A published in Uncut magazine in 2006, Morrissey answered the question "Banarama or Girls Around?" with "The Slits".
  • Their song "Love Und Romance" was included in the intermission music on the third American leg of the Greatest Hits tour.

Small Faces

  • Their song "Lazy Sunday" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • In a Q&A published in Mojo in 2004, when asked "And your Sunday morning record?", Morrissey answered "'Death' by Klaus Nomi, or 'Lazy Sunday' by The Small Faces."
  • The latter song was also mentioned as an early favourite in Morrissey's autobiography.

Small, Millie

  • Interviewed for the 1997 Brit Girls documentary, Morrissey said "Incredible. 'My Boy Lollipop' was about one minute 10 seconds long. Fantastic record. Incredibly energetic and spicy and... pert. People don't sing like that any more apart from me."
  • A video of her song "My Boy Lollipop" was shown before concerts on the 2009 Swords Tour.

Smith, Bessie

  • A cover of her song "Wake Up Johnny" was sent as a demo by Morrissey to Buzzcocks manager Richard Boon in the early 1980s.

Smith, Hurricane

  • His song "Don't Let It Die" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.

Smith, Patti

  • In a letter published in a British music magazine on 21 July 1976 Morrissey wrote "The New York Dolls and Patti Smith have proved that there is some life pumping away in the swamps and gutters of New York and they are the only acts which originated from the N.Y. club scene worthy of any praise."
  • In a letter to the editor published by the NME in early 1976 Morrissey wrote: "...in these dark days when Patti Smith, Loudon Wainwright or even the New York Dolls fail to make an impact on Radio 1 DJs, common sense is therefore not so common."

  • In a letter published in Sounds on 25 September 1976 Morrissey wrote "Horses by Patti Smith has virtually no competition as the most exciting rock album of the year and it shows more potential than just about any other release in recent memory. There is no 'beat on the brat' nonsense. Patti is intriguing without being boring and every track is laced with her own brand of sardonic humour."
  • She was also mentioned positively by Morrissey in a letter printed in the 11 November 1976 issue of Melody Maker.
  • The ads section of a December 1976 issue of Sounds includes one where "Dolls / Patti fans wanted for Manchester-based punk band", attributed to Morrissey.
  • Morrissey attended a fanzine press conference (to promote her album "Easter") in February 1978.
  • Morrissey and Marr first met at a Patti Smith concert on 31 August 1978 but it would be another 4 years until they would meet again and form the Smiths.
  • Morrissey supposedly took a trip to New York City in 1979 to attend a Patti Smith poetry reading event.
  • It has been speculated that her name was one of the many reasons why Morrissey wanted to call his first band the Smiths.
  • Her song Kimberly was an inspiration (mostly musically, but also lyrically) on Morrissey and Marr when they wrote "The Hand That Rocks The Cradle". Johnny Rogan's "The Visual Documentary" shows a copy of a set list from The Smiths' first rehearsal and next to the chords to "The Hand That Rocks the Cradle" Johnny Marr had written "Kimberly".
  • Her song "Fire Of Unknown Origin" was mentioned by Morrissey in 1985's Meat Is Murder tour programme as one of his favourite singles.
  • According to biographer Len Brown Sandie Shaw was encouraged by Morrissey and Marr in 1986 to cover Patti Smith's "Frederick".
  • Her song "Hey Joe" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks released in 2003 under the title "Under The Influence".
  • In an interview to XL magazine in 2006 Morrissey said "Her first four albums changed everything. They changed me."
  • Her song "Frederick" was played before concerts at the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • Morrissey included a cover of her song "Redondo Beach" in his sets in late 2006. A live recording from that period was featured on his live album "Live At Earls Court" and released as a single.
  • In a Q&A session published on the True-To-You website in June 2007 Morrissey said "As for 'Redondo Beach', I've always said how Patti Smith's 'Horses' album changed my life. When I told Patti I had released it as a single she said it wouldn't chart because of the 'Patti Smith curse', but we just missed the top ten by a few copies, even though, as always, zero airplay. I also had it in my mind that the opening line was 'let it be known,' which it isn't, it's 'late afternoon'."
  • Morrissey biographer Len Brown suggests that a famous Robert Mapplethorpe photograph showing Patti Smith with the words "Pasolini est vie" next to her probably inspired the line "Pasolini is me" in Morrissey's "You Have Killed Me".
  • Her song "Redondo Beach" was played during intermission music on the third American leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • On the occasion of Friday the 13th August 2010, Morrissey sent to thequietus.com a list of his top 13 albums, which included Patti Smith's "Horses" at #3.
  • In an interview to Radionica (Columbia) in early 2012, Morrissey mentioned Patti Smith in a list of artists he was indebted to.
  • She supported Morrissey on his 1 March 2013 concert in Los Angeles.
  • Morrissey talks about the discovery of Patti Smith and her "Horses" album in his autobiography.

Smiths, The (!)

  • The band was slotted by Morrissey at #1 in a list of favourite Manchester musical artists published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME under the title "Moanchester, So Much To Answer For".

Smoking Popes

  • In an interview given to KROQ on 6 July 1997 Morrissey asked that their song "Need You Around" be played. He then mentioned how he thought that their album "Destination Failure" was excellent.
  • They supported Morrissey on the second American leg of the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • Their song "Midnight Moon" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • Their song "Writing A Letter" was played during intermission on the 2002 tour.
  • Their cover of "You'll Never Walk Alone" was played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • Their song "Rubella" was played during intermission on the third American leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • He requested that their song "If You Don't Care" be played when he was interviewed by Janice Long in October 2008.
  • Something of theirs was played during intermission on the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.
  • On the occasion of Friday the 13th August 2010, Morrissey sent to thequietus.com a list of his top 13 albums, which included the Smoking Popes' "Born To Quit" at #11.

Snow, Hank

  • His "Old Shep" was played during intermission on the 2002 tour.
  • It was also played before concerts on the 2009 Swords Tour.

Soil

Sons And Daughters

  • They were Morrissey's support band in England and Europe during the first few months of his Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.

Soundgarden

  • Morrissey attended a Soundgarden concert in February 2013.

Sparks

  • Morrissey had a letter praising their "Kimono My House" album published in the 14 June 1974 issue of the NME.
  • He also published an article praising the band in a Scottish fanzine called Next Big Thing in 1979.
  • The line "The rain is pouring on the foreign town, the bullets cannot cut you down" from Sparks' "This Town Ain't Big Enough For Both Of Us" was very likely an influence on the line " The rain falls hard on a humdrum town, this town has dragged you down" in the Smiths' "William It Was Really Nothing".
  • Their song "Beaver O'Lindy" features the line "The London that's dead, the London that's dead", which Morrissey may have adapted for "Glamorous Glue" ("London is dead, London is dead").
  • Their song "Arts And Crafts Spectacular" was played during intermission on the 2002 tour.
  • A previously unreleased version of the latter song was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks released in 2003 under the title "Under The Influence". In that album's liner notes Morrissey wrote: "In a glorious surge of deserved success in 1974, the very comprehensive lyric sheets accompanying Sparks albums prove that Ron Mael is clearly driven to tell, yet he answers the media by skillfil Quietism and by impersonating various walls. Ron Mael is an undoubted genius, and where else would a true genius live but in the catacombs of hell? Ron asks his younger brother Russell to sing the words - in chilling falsetto. Russell sings in what appear to be French italics, and has less facial hair that Josephine Baker. It is a scream, because the songs are screams. (...) Who on earth would write a pop song in such a way? A song about an arts and crafts competition where 'lovely Claudine Jones/has to come to push her quilt', but where Tracy Wise gets a prize. There is no category for this madness - except the category of madness, and Sparks are only let down by their name. At 14, I want to live with these people, to be - at last! - in the company of creatures of my own species."
  • Their song "Thank God It's Not Christmas" was played during intermission on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour.
  • Their song "Barbecutie" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks titled "Songs To Save Your Life" given away with the 19 June 2004 issue of the NME.
  • Morrissey asked Sparks to perform their "Kimono My House" album entirely for the 2004 Meltdown festival which he curated. In an interview published in Time Out magazine at the time he said: "In 1974 the whirling rhythms of 'Kimono My House' by Sparks completely stopped me in my tracks. Russell, I thought, had the most beautiful female voice in pop music, and Ron was and still is like an abandoned ventriloquist's doll. Lines such as 'You mentioned Kant and I was shocked/Because where I come from none of the girls have such foul tongues' were, to me, magnificently funny. Mind you, I was quite ill at the time."
  • In an interview published in the January 2006 issue of Uncut, Marr said that he and Morrissey were both fans of "This Town Ain't Big Enough For Both Of Us".
  • Their song "Alabamy Right" was played during intermission early on the Greatest Hits tour.
  • When invited to play his favourite bands on KCRW's Guest DJ Project in August 2008, Morrissey chose their song "Moon Over Kentucky".
  • The video for their song "Lighten Up Morrissey" was shown during intermission on portions of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.
  • Their song "Something For The Girl With Everything" was played before concerts on the 2009 Swords Tour.
  • A video of their song "This Town Ain't Big Enough For The Both Of Us" was shown before concerts on the 2009 Swords Tour.
  • On the occasion of Friday the 13th August 2010, Morrissey sent to thequietus.com a list of his top 13 albums, which included Sparks' "Kimono My House" at #6.
  • On the occasion of re-release of "EVeryday Is Like Sunday", Morrissey's Facebook page created a Spotify playlist of Morrissey 'Supreme 13 Singles' which included the Sparks' "This Town Ain't Big Enough For Both Of Us".
  • Morrissey talks about his discovery of Sparks in his autobiography and even quotes from some of their lyrics.

Springfield, Dusty

  • Her song "You Don't Have To Say You Love Me" was played during intermission on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.
  • Interviewed for the 1997 Brit Girls documentary Morrissey said "Dusty was incredibly important. (...) Dusty singing 'The Corrupt Ones' in 1966 or 1967 was thin ince, and there was Dusty skating on it. (...) She made many great records but I think she seemed to be older than everyone else, more sensible and more liked by the older generation, which wasn't necessarily off-putting but... could be."
  • In a 2012 email interview to the Columbus Dispatch, Morrissey said "Wikipedia names Dusty Springfield as my first influence. I don’t actually think I’ve ever even mentioned her name — and I was never remotely a fan."
  • Morrissey interviewed (source unknown): "(...) Dusty Springfield just made too many bad records, awful things like 'Son Of A Preacher Man' which completely went against her original introductory records which are timeless."

Springwater

  • Their song "I Will Return" was played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI and early on the Greatest Hits tour.

Stefani, Gwen

  • As he was introducing his newest single "I Just Want To See The Boy Happy" during the 10 December 2006 concert in Luxembourg and complaining about its poor performance in the charts, Morrissey said "Well #1 is just impossible, no airplay, blah-blah-blah-blah, Gwen Stefano, Gwen Stefano, waaargghh... actually she's not too bad..." After the song's performance he returned to the subject: "So one final confession, one final confession, I like Gwen Stefano, I do, I do, I do, I do, I do..."

Sterling, Linda
   See Ludus.

Stinky Toys

  • Their song "Boozy Creed" was played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.

Stockholm Monsters, The

Stooges and Iggy Pop

  • The Stooges songs "Your Pretty Face is Going to Hell" and "Search And Destroy" were played during intermission music at various points into the Greatest Hits tour.
  • Their song "Your Pretty Face Is Going To Hell" was chosen by Morrissey as one of his Desert Island Discs on his appearance on the BBC Radio4 show of that name in November 2009.
  • In an interview to Radionica (Columbia) in early 2012, Morrissey mentioned Iggy Pop in a list of artists he was indebted to.
  • Morrissey talks about the discovery of Iggy & The STooges and their "Raw Power" album in his autobiography.

Storm, Gale

  • Her song "Lucky Lips" was a hit in May 1959 when Morrissey was born. Morrissey recorded a song titled "Lucky Lisp" which has led to some speculation by certain fans and biographers. It must be said that Cliff Richard also recorded a song with that title.

Stranglers, The

  • They have a song called "Dagenham Dave", but there is no reason to believe it had any influence on the creation of Morrissey's song of the same name. Morrissey has never otherwise mentioned the Stranglers.

Stubbs, Levi

  • He came in at #10 in a top 15 list of "most revered singers" put up on the True To You website on 1 January 2014, despite never having been mentioned as a favourite before.

Suede

  • Championed by Morrissey in 1992, Morrissey sang his own version of their early b-side "My Insatiable One" at concerts that same year.
  • In an interview to Modern Rock Live in 1992 Morrissey said that Suede were one of the two modern bands he was in love with, specifying "something to become excited by".
  • Morrissey quickly fell out with the band as they gained notoriety.

Sundays, The

  • At the V Festival on 19 August 2006, after bowing alongside his musicians, Morrissey found a way of mentionning the bad weather and his return to England by beginning his set singing a few lines from their song "Can't Be Sure": "England my England / The home of the free / Such miserable weather..."

Sundown Playboys

  • Their song "Saturday Nite Special" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks released in 2003 under the title "Under The Influence". In the liner notes of that album Morrissey described how he discovered and fell in love with the song.
  • The latter song was also played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • On the occasion of re-release of "Everyday Is Like Sunday", Morrissey's Facebook page created a Spotify playlist of Morrissey 'Supreme 13 Singles' which included "Saturday Nite Special".
  • In his "Autobiography", Morrissey discusses the trouble of getting the rights to include "Saturday Nite Special" on the "Under The Influence" cd.

Supremes

  • On the occasion of re-release of "EVeryday Is Like Sunday", Morrissey's Facebook page created a Spotify playlist of Morrissey 'Supreme 13 Singles' which included the Supremes' "I'm Livin' In Shame".

System Of A Down

  • Their song "Lonely Day" was played during intermission on the third American leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • In a 2012 email interview to news.com.au, Morrissey mentioned the latter song as being "the last song I absolutely loved".
  • In a 2012 email interview to the Village Voice, he said of the latter song: "It caught me in the right way at the right moment. I like the band generally, and the main vocals (by Serj Tankian) always have interesting tunings, almost Arabic, sounding like ancient codes for bewailing the dead or something. Although 'Lonely Day' wasn't sung by Serj."

Tams

  • Morrissey appears to be a fan of their song "Be Young, Be Foolish, Be Happy" and not necessarily a fan of the band. He ended a private letter to penpal Robert Mackie in the early 80s (since leaked to fans and on the internet) with the words of the song's title.
  • The song was mentioned alongside nine others in a list titled "Portrait Of The Artist As A Consumer", Morrissey's top ten films, symbolists, records and books published in the 17 September 1983 issue of the NME.
  • On a radio programme called My Top Ten broadcast in October 1984 Morrissey chose to include that song in his top ten.
  • In an interview published in The Face in 1985 Morrissey that he loved this song "...because of the sentiment. Not that I could ever relate to it. But then maybe that's why I found it so appealing in the first place."
  • In a Q&A published in Mojo in 2004, when asked "What is your favourite Saturday night record?", Morrissey answered "'Be Young, Be Foolish, Be Happy' by The Tams."
  • On the occasion of re-release of "EVeryday Is Like Sunday", Morrissey's Facebook page created a Spotify playlist of Morrissey 'Supreme 13 Singles' which included "Be Young, Be Foolish, Be Happy".

Taylor, Vince

  • A video of him performing "Twist It" was shown between opening act and Morrissey on dates from the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI, the Greatest Hits tour of 2007-2008 and on portions of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.

Telephone Boxes, The

Television Personalities

  • Their song "Part-Time Punks" was played during intermission on the 2002 tour.

Thrills

  • Their song "One Horse Town" was played during intermission on the 2002 tour.
  • They supported Morrissey in London on 17 September 2002 and in Dublin on 3 October 2002.

Tiger Army

  • They were the support band on a few Morrissey dates in the USA and England at the very beginning of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.

Tillotson, Johnny

  • His song "Send Me The Pillow You Dream On" seems to have inspired the last lines in the Smiths' "Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others". It must be said that many other people have recorded versions of this song, including Charlie Feathers (see higher in this list) and Dean Martin.

Toys, The

  • In "Yeahs And Yeuks", a list of loved and hated songs published in No.1 magazine in 1985, their song "Lover's Concerto" was listed at #9 in the "yeahs" section.
  • Their song "Attack" was mentioned in a list of Morrissey favourites titled "Singles To Be Cremated With" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.

Traffic

  • Their song "Hole In my Shoe" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • The band was also mentioned by Morrissey in an interview given during the American leg of the "Maladjusted" tour to Swedish Magazine Pop (published in the January 1998 issue).

Travis

  • In an interview given to KROQ on 6 July 1997 Morrissey mentioned this (then) new band as being one of his current favourites.

T.Rex / Tyrannosaurus Rex / Marc Bolan

  • According to the Meat Is Murder tour programme the first concert Morrissey attended was T-Rex at the Manchester Bellevue in July 1972.
  • T-Rex's "Metal Guru" was an obvious inspiration on the Smiths' "Panic".
  • Some T-Rex was played between the opening artist and the Smiths on the band's final date on 12 December 1986.
  • In an interview published in the NME on 13 February 1988 Morrissey said of the Smiths' song "Paint A Vulgar Picture": "It was about the music industry in general, about practically anybody who's died and left behind that frenetic fanatical legacy which sends people scrambling. Billy Fury, Marc Bolan..."
  • The song "The Visit" features a repeated chorus of "Truly I do love you", a line Morrissey used in his own "Late Night, Maudlin Street".
  • In an interview given to journalist Len Brown (date/source needed), Morrissey said "Marc Bolan was very important to me. Extremely important. He made some great records, even before he became famous, before he bacame the teeny bopper star. His earlier stuff, with Tyrannosaurus Rex, I found really moving. These records are still very important to me. (...) To me he was pretty inexplicable and he seemed very lonely and mixed up and confused. And I'd never seen that in pop music before." Morrissey also said in that interview that he has pilgrimaged to where Marc Bolan died in a car accident.
  • Morrissey performed a cover of T-Rex's "Cosmic Dancer" on his Kill Uncle tour. He released a live recording from the 1 May 1991 show as a b-side on the "Pregnant For The Last Time" single and a different live recording, this one from 1 June 1991, on his anthology "My Early Burglary Years".
  • The T-Rex songs "Metal Guru" and "Cosmic Dancer" were played during intermission on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.
  • In an introduction for the 1992 Marc Bolan biography "Marc Bolan, Wilderness Of The Mind" Morrissey wrote: "I can't cleverly theorize about Marc; I just loved him, and any judgement of him ultimately sways to a favourable conclusion. (...) I cried to certain songs before I even knew the words. (...) My indispensables are "Prophets, Seers And Sages," "My People Were Fair," and "T. Rex," with "Metal Guru" as the moment of complete perfection."
  • Morrissey's "Certain People I Know" was musically inspired by T-Rex's "Ride A White Swan". The 7" promo to the latter single was actually designed to look like a T-Rex record and Morrissey would refer to the song as "Certain White Swans I Know" in live performances of the song on the Your Arsenal tour.
  • The T-Rex song "Telegram Sam" was played during intermission on the 1995 dates promoting "Southpaw Grammar".
  • The Tyrannosaurus Rex song "King Of The Rumbling Spires" was played during intermission on the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • The Tyrannosaurus Rex song "Great Horse" was included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks released in 2003 under the title "Under The Influence". In the liner note to that album Morrissey wrote "However Bo(b) (dy)lan remains - in my mind's ear - the sound of late 1960's Notting Hill bedsits, unsuitable daytime heat in busy London Parks, the future not yet behind us, and we are on our way. I see T. Rex live in 1972, and I meet the singer three years later, when I request the binding autograph, and although there is no one but he and I around for miles, the Stamford Hill boy declines the request. Just too much trouble. I am still amazed at the brevity of Marc Bolan's success, and at the speed of his decay, and by how people who knew him never seem to say anything nice about him. But, weren't we made to be this way?"
  • The T-Rex song "The Groover" was played during intermission on the 2004 You Are The Quarry tour.
  • Something by T-Rex or Marc Bolan was played before concerts at the tail end of the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • The T-Rex song "The Broken-Hearted Blues" was played during intermission early on the Greatest Hits tour.
  • T.Rex are mentioned as an early favourite in Morrissey's autobiography. Amongst other things, he mentions being turned down by Marc Bolan when he asked him for an autograph.

Tucker, Sophie

Twinkle

  • Twinkle's song "Golden Lights" was covered by The Smiths.
  • Lines from her song "Terry" were adapted for early drafts of the Smiths' "Paint A Vulgar Picture".
  • Her song "Terry" was mentioned in a list of Morrissey favourites titled "Singles To Be Cremated With" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.
  • Her version of "Golden Lights" was played during intermission on the 1991 Kill Uncle tour.
  • In an interview for the Brit Girls documentary first broadcast late 1997 (UK, Channel 4), Morrissey said "Twinkle was trouble and that's why she was so interesting. Her major hit 'Terry' was a death disc and was banned by the BBC. She wasn't allowed on Ready, Steady, Go! because the song was too morbid. So obviously I bought 12 of them. It reached number four. Great tune, great words. Very unusual to have a teenager singing about death and she also wrote most of her own stuff. So Twinkle was amusing and interesting and don't-blink-or-you'll miss her. Sometimes little spurts of career can be more important than careers that go on for hundreds of years. (On why the Smiths covered her song 'Golden Lights') Because it reminded me of the Gene Pitney backstage 'I'm lonely' type drama. I thought it was very dramatic. (...) So 'Golden Lights' was just a slight interesting twisty insight into the perils of fame and change and all the great things that happen to you when you are no longer anonymous."
  • In a Q&A session published on the True-To-You website in June 2007 Morrissey wrote: "Everything has its place and its reason. Certainly, the early Smiths covers, for example 'Work is a four-letter word' and 'Golden lights' were done as acts of playful perversity - they weren't meant to be groundbreaking miracles of sound. And that's usually how it is, just a matter of throwing something unexpected into the mix."

Upshaw, Dawn

  • She came in at #13 in a top 15 list of "most revered singers" put up on the True To You website on 1 January 2014, despite never having been mentioned as a favourite before.

Velvelettes

  • Their song "Needle In A Haystack" was rehearsed by the Nosebleeds during the short period in 1978 when Morrissey was part of the (remains of that) band. The decision to tackle this cover was of course Morrissey's.
  • The latter song was also suggested as a possible cover version to Slaughter And The Dogs after Morrissey auditioned for them in the late 1970s (although Morrissey denies ever auditioning for them).

Velvet Underground

  • Their song "That's The Story Of My Life" may have inspired the last line of the Smiths' "Half A Person"
  • Their song "The Black Angel's Death Song" was played during intermission on the 1995 Boxers tour.
  • "The Black Angel's Death Song" was also played during intermission on the third American leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • Their "Black Angel's Death Song" was chosen by Morrissey as one of his Desert Island Discs on his appearance on the BBC Radio4 show of that name in November 2009.
  • Their songs "Sister Ray", "The Gift" and "I Heard Her Call My Name" were played before concerts on the 2009 Swords Tour.
  • On the occasion of Friday the 13th August 2010, Morrissey sent to thequietus.com a list of his top 13 albums, which included the Velvet Underground's "White Light/White Heat" at #7 and "The Velvet Underground And Nico" at #8.
  • Morrissey in interview (source needed): "I spent my entire twelfth year locked in my bedroom with 'All Tomorrow's Parties'."
  • Also see solo members Lou Reed and Nico.

Verbow

Village, The

Wainwright, Loudon III

  • He was praised by Morrissey in at least two letters to the NME editor in 1977.
  • Morrissey quoted from his song "Uptown" in his book "The New York Dolls".
  • He was invited by Morrissey to perform at the Meltdown festival which he curated in 2004. In interview to Time Out magazine at the time, Morrissey said: "Loudon Wainwright is an honoured guest."
  • Morrissey mentions in his autobiography to have come up with the name T-Shirt for a pre-Smiths band (now incorrectly referred to as the Nosebleeds) through that of a Loudon Wainwright album.

Warwick, Dionne

  • Her song "Loneliness Remembers What Happiness Forgets" was mentioned in a list of Morrissey favourites titled "Singles To Be Cremated With" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.

Wasden, Jaybee

  • His song "De Castrow" was played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • That song was also played during intermission on the 1995 Boxers tour and the 1997 Maladjusted tour.
  • The song was also included on Morrissey's compilation of favourite tracks released in 2003 under the title "Under The Influence". In that album's liner notes Morrissey wrote: "(...) the imagination chatters convulsively through Nat Couty's 'Woodpecker Rock', Charlie Feathers' 'one Hand Loose', Jimmy Radcliffe's 'The Forgotten Man', and Jay Bee Wasden's 'De Castro'. Of these last four, I would not pretend to know any background details, but the happiness these songs give me seems, now, to be everlasting - even if this is music played with a lop-sided grim, then please hook me."

Well-Oiled Sisters

  • They supported Morrissey in the UK and Europe on the final leg of the 1992 Your Arsenal tour.

Wigan's Ovation

  • In an interview given to journalist Len Brown in 1988, Morrissey discussed this band's three singles and answered the question "So you were into all that?" with "Oh, completely. As a spectator. Yes, definitely Wigan's Ovation and Chicory Tip." This was published in Brown's biography "Meetings With Morrissey".

Wombats, The

  • They were picked by Morrissey as guests when he headlined the 2008 O2 Wireless Festival in London.

Wood, Victoria

  • The words to the Smiths' "Rusholme Ruffians" are without doubt 'taken on loan' from her song "Fourteen Again" ("Free rides on the waltzers off the fairground men", "the last night of the fair", "behind the generator with your coconut, the coloured lights reflected in the Brylcreem in his hair", "tattoo myself with a fountain pen", "When I was funny, I was famous").
  • Morrissey also drew words from others songs by Victoria Wood, such as "Northerners" ("brass-money") and "Funny How Things Turn Out" ("my faith in myself is still devout"; "sing Lerner and Lowe to the mentally ill").
  • In 1985, Morrissey jokingly spread the rumour that she and him would be married before the end of the year. She played along and said that they "have been married for eleven months, though owing to touring commitments, we have not yet met."
  • In 1986, Morrissey said that she was that year's most wonderful human being. (source needed)

Woodentops

Workman, Hawksley

Would-Be's

  • They supported Morrissey in Dublin on 27 April 1991, the very first date of the Kill Uncle tour.
  • In a Morrissey Q&A posted on website True-To-You in January 2006 Morrissey said: "Years ago, in Dublin, The Would-Be's ran on, looked at the crowd, and then immediately ran off. That didn't quite work..."

Wyngarde, Peter

  • On his 2009 appearance on UK television programme Friday Night with Jonathan Ross, Morrissey gave Ross a copy of a Peter Wyngarde LP.

Wynne, Philippé

  • He came in at #3 in a top 15 list of "most revered singers" put up on the True To You website on 1 January 2014, despite he or his band the Spinners never having been mentioned as a favourite before.

X-Ray Spex

  • Their song "The Day The World Turned Dayglo" was played during intermission on the 1995 dates promoting "Southpaw Grammar".
  • Their song "Cigarettes" was played during intermission on the 1999 Oye Esteban tour.
  • Their song "Warrior In Woolworth's" was played during intermission on the 2000 Oye Esteban tour.

Young, Kristeen

  • She was Morrissey's opening act for all dates from the middle of 2006 to (almost) the end of 2007. She was set to support Morrissey again once in Oakland in April 2009, but that concert ended up being cancelled.
  • Morrissey released her single "Kill The Father" b/w "Life's Not Short, It's Sooooo Long" on his Attack label in August 2006. He said of the a-side that it was "the best song I've heard for 50 years".
  • "Kill The Father" was played during intermission on the Tour Of The Tormentors MMVI.
  • Morrissey released her single "London Cry"/"This Is The Dawn Of My D-Day" on his Attack label in December 2006.
  • She has lent vocals to Morrissey's b-Side "Sweetie-Pie," and has recorded a vocal part on "That's How People Grow Up".
  • In a Q&A published on the True-To-You website in July 2006 Morrissey said: "Kristeen, I think, will soon be bigger than life. To me, she already is."
  • In a Q&A published on the True-To-You website in September 2006 he said: "Kristeen is a dramatic woman - monumental vocal gifts, unwalkable heels, hypnotic way with the keyboard, and underneath it all she is still 16 (and a half.) I watch her set every night and I am dazed. I was thrilled by audience reactions to Kristeen - especially in Iceland and Italy where their intakes of breath could be heard as Kristeen ripped into the high notes. She is an artist who adapts the world to her own needs, which I appreciate. There's no other way."
  • An article published in the Guardian in 2007 features Morrissey talking about Kristeen Young, and vice versa.
  • The title line in "All You Need Is Me" might have been inspired by a line in Kristeen's song "No Other God".
  • Something of hers was played during intermission on the UK/France leg of the Greatest Hits tour.
  • "You Must Love Me" was played during intermission on a portion of the 2009 Tour Of Refusal.
  • She supported Morrissey on the latter half of his 2011 tour and on most dates in 2012, 2013 and 2014.
  • Morrissey praised her and her art at length in his "Autobiography".

Young, Neil

  • Morrissey has never mentioned appreciating the work of Neil Young, but his song "Revolution Blues" features the lines "you never see us" and "keep the population down" which appear in Morrissey's "Ambitious Outsiders".

Young The Giant

  • Morrissey expressed his admiration for the band in a missive to the True To You website on 1 June 2011.

Yuro, Timi

  • Her song "Insult To Injury" was mentioned with nine other records in a list titled "Portrait Of The Artist As A Consumer", Morrissey's top ten films, symbolists, records and books published in the 17 September 1983 issue of the NME.
  • On a radio programme called My Top Ten broadcast in October 1984 Morrissey played that song
  • In 1985's Meat Is Murder tour programme Morrissey wrote that she was his favourite singer.
  • In "Yeahs And Yeuks", a list of loved and hated songs published in No.1 magazine in 1985, her song "Insult To Injury" was listed at #2 in the "yeahs" section.
  • "Insult To Injury" was mentioned again in a list of Morrissey favourites titled "Singles To Be Cremated With" published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME.
  • She was mentioned in a list of Morrissey's favourite singers titled "Bigmouths - The Singer Not The Song" published in the same issue of the NME.
  • "Insult To Injury" was also played in 1994 during a Morrissey signing session at HMV for the release of the album "Vauxhall & I".
  • Timi Yuro was mentioned by Morrissey as one of his favourite singers in an interview to Raygun in March 1994.
  • A cover version of her song "Interlude" was recorded and released as a single in 1994 by Morrissey in duet with Siouxsie.
  • Interviewed for the 1997 Brit Girls documentary, when asked why he had covered her song 'Interlude', Morrissey said "It was a very obscure song. It was a b-side and I thought she sang it really beautifully."
  • Her song "Smile" was played during intermission on the 2000 Oye Esteban tour.
  • In April 2004, Morrissey announced Yuro's death on his official website, describing her as his "favourite singer".
  • She has a song titled "All I Need Is You" while Morrissey has a song called "All You Need Is Me" but making a connection between the two might be stretching too far.
  • Morrissey (source unknown): "I am very interested in Sandie Shaw and singers who are similar to her like Timi Yuro and Rita Pavone. They both suffered a hasty eclipse. It was because of them I wrote my book 'The History off the Female Voice in Popular Music'. Two publishers are interested in it."
  • She came in at #5 in a top 15 list of "most revered singers" put up on the True To You website on 1 January 2014.

Zipguns

808 State

  • They were slotted by Morrissey at #9 in a list of favourite Manchester musical artists published in the 16 September 1989 issue of the NME under the title "Moanchester, So Much To Answer For".
  • In an interview given to Len Brown in 1990, Morrissey mentions buying 808 State's "Pacific State": "Somewhere along the line I bought an 808 State record which I quite enjoyed. 'Specific State' or whatever it was called." This part of the interview remained unpublished until its inclusion in Brown's biography "Meetings With Morrissey".

 

Quotes

In a 2012 email interview to the Columbus Dispatch, Morrissey said "Whenever I listened to music, I was ready to cry, usually with relief that someone understood and that I was no longer alone in knowing whatever it was I thought I knew." and "People who make music never die. The song lives on forever — and, as soon as it’s heard, you are as alive and young and demented as you were when the song was recorded."